bacterial pathogenesis


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bacterial pathogenesis

The development of a bacterial disease. There are three stages: entry and colonization in the host, bacterial invasion and reproduction with the production of toxic substances, and the response of the host. The mere presence of an organism in the body does not necessarily mean that disease will follow. This progression of the infection will depend upon a number of interacting factors, including the virulence and number of invading organisms and the ability of the host's immune system to destroy the bacteria.
See also: pathogenesis
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this huge potential for the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis has not yet been completely realized because of the substantial technical problems associated with accurately measuring bacterial gene expression during real infections.
The first wave of DNA microarray experiments of relevance to bacterial pathogenesis focused on analyzing bacterial gene expression during growth in vitro under conditions chosen to mimic some aspect of infection.
This continues a successful partnership that has resulted in the co-development of innovative products that are used in Bio-Rad's ProteomeWorks(TM) system and enables APAF to expand its bioinformatics capabilities and its bacterial pathogenesis discovery program.
Schwan is a senior investigator in the Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
The program's main focus is the immunochemistry of carbohydrates as related to bacterial pathogenesis and vaccine design, and is pursued through the Glycobiology, Novel Antibodies, Pathogenesis and Vaccine Design research groups.
Coverage has included topics as diverse as Morbillivirus in Australia, tuberculosis trends in Japan, antimicrobial resistance in Europe, infectious disease emergence in New Zealand, genomics and bacterial pathogenesis, amphibian population declines, the role of migratory birds in the spread of West Nile virus, infections in the health-care setting, bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and bioterrorism.
His research interests include the mechanism and evolution of bacterial pathogenesis, especially of enteropathogens such as vibrios and Escherichia coli.
Her research interests are bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance.
He has worked with human mycoplasmas for the last 12 years and is interested in bacterial pathogenesis, in particular in the field of autoimmune diseases triggered by mycoplasmas.
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