bacterial interference

bac·te·ri·al in·ter·fer·ence

the condition in which colonization by one bacterial strain prevents colonization by another strain.

bacterial interference

The limitation of the growth of one bacterium by another, e.g., in a culture or in a susceptible organism.

bac·te·ri·al in·ter·fer·ence

(bak-tērē-ăl intĕr-fērĕns)
Condition in which colonization by one bacterial strain prevents colonization by another strain.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the bacterial interference approach to combating UTI, innocuous bacteria are allowed to colonize the bladder, which in turn, inhibits colonization of the bacteria that cause the symptomatic infection.
WASHINGTON -- Recurring, uncomplicated urinary tract infections in female patients may be treated in the future through bacterial interference and other novel approaches, but for now, treatment involves an individualized approach with possible postcoital prophylaxis, chronic low-dose prophylaxis, or self-therapy, said urologist Robert M.
Other forms of bacterial interference may prove efficacious, however.
WASHINGTON--Recurring, uncomplicated urinary tract infections in female patients may be treated in the future through bacterial interference and other novel approaches, but for now, treatment involves an individualized approach with possible postcoital prophylaxis, chronic low-dose prophylaxis, or self-therapy, said urologist Robert M.
Far more complex and less well understood are the dynamics at play between the three main arms of the "bacterial eradication" equation--namely, antibiotics, the host immune response, and bacterial interference.
Bacterial interference is a concept that is gaining support as an alternative to biofilms as an explanation for bacterial persistence in the face of appropriate antibiotic treatment.
The concept of bacterial interference argues against the use of broader- and broader-spectrum antibiotics when managing patients with infections such as MRSA.
They suggested that bacterial interference might be minimized by settling larvae in clean containers and adding diatoms as postlarval feed 1 2 days after GABA.
rufescens, but may not be optimal for commercial production, because of potential bacterial interference (which may also differ among tanks) (Searcy-Bernal et al.
In abalone research, antibiotics have been used in an effort to control bacterial interference during the chemical induction of larval metamorphosis, as well as mortality during postlarval development.