adhesion

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adhesion

 [ad-he´zhun]
1. a fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere.
2. union of two surfaces that are normally separate, such as in wound healing or in some pathological process. Surgery within the abdomen sometimes results in adhesions from scar tissue; as an organ heals, fibrous scar tissue forms around the incision and may cling to the surface of adjoining organs. Adhesions are usually painless and cause no difficulties, but occasionally they produce pain, with or without obstruction or malfunction, by distorting the organ. They can also occur following peritonitis and other inflammatory conditions. They may occur in the pleura, in the pericardium, and around the pelvic organs, in addition to the abdomen. Surgery is sometimes required to release symptomatic adhesions.
3. artificial joining of two things, such as the bonding of materials to a tooth.

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn),
1. The process of adhering or uniting of two surfaces or parts, especially the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound. Synonym(s): adhesio, conglutination (1)
2. In the pleural and peritoneal cavities, inflammatory bands that connect opposing serous surfaces; the direct result of trauma or inflammation of the serosal surfaces.
3. Physical attraction of unlike molecules for one another.
4. Molecular attraction existing between the surfaces of bodies in contact.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]

adhesion

/ad·he·sion/ (ad-he´zhun)
1. the property of remaining in close proximity.
2. the stable joining of parts to one another, which may occur abnormally.
3. a fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere.

interthalamic adhesion  a band of gray matter joining the thalami; it develops as a secondary adhesion and is often absent.
primary adhesion  healing by first intention.
secondary adhesion  healing by second intention.

adhesion

(ăd-hē′zhən)
n.
1. The act or state of sticking together.
2. A condition in which body tissues that are normally separate grow together.
3. A fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures.
4. The union of opposing surfaces of a wound, especially in healing.

adhesion

[adhē′zhən]
Etymology: L, adhaerens, sticking to
a band of scar tissue that binds anatomical surfaces that normally are separate from each other. Adhesions most commonly form in the abdomen after abdominal surgery, inflammation, or injury. A loop of intestine may adhere to unhealed areas. Scar tissue constricting the bowel's lumen may cause intestinal obstruction, blocking intestinal flow and causing abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and distention. Nasogastric intubation and suction may relieve symptoms. If the intestinal obstruction does not resolve spontaneously, surgery to lyse adhesions may be necessary. See also adhesiotomy.

Adhesion

The stable joining of parts to each other, or the union of 2 opposing tissue surfaces, which may be normal or abnormal.
Chemistry The property of remaining in close proximity, as that resulting from the physical attraction of molecules to a substance or the molecular attraction existing between surfaces.
Haematology See Platelet adhesion.
Surgery Synechia A collagen-rich fibrous band, scar, or stricture which forms after an intervention in a surgical field, classically in the peritoneal cavity after abdominal surgery or laparotomy; gentle manipulation of the organs and removal of blood minimises adhesive band formation.
Aetiology Adhesions are caused by suppression of fibrinolytic activity, focal decrease in plasminogen activator in the serosal lining or to local inflammation or infection.
Clinical findings May be severe enough to cause bowel obstruction, pelvic pain and infertility.
Factors in surgical adhesion formation:
• Port wound above site of dissection
• Ischaemia
• Drying of serosal surfaces
• Excessive suturing
• Omental patches
• Traction of peritoneum
• Retained blood clots, stones or dead tissue
• Prolonged operation
• Visceral injury
• Infection
• Delayed postoperative mobilisation of patient
• Postoperative pain due to inadequate analgesia

adhesion

The stable joining of parts to each other, or the union of 2 opposing tissue surfaces, which may be normal or abnormal Hematology See Platelet adhesion Surgery Synechia A collagen-rich fibrous band, scar, or stricture, that forms after an intervention in a surgical field, classically in the peritoneal cavity after abdominal surgery or laparotomy; adhesions may be related to a focal ↓ in plasminogen activator in the mesothelial lining or to local inflammation or infection; gentle manipulation of the organs and removal of blood minimizes adhesive band formation, which may be severe enough to cause intestinal obstruction; nothing effectively prevents adhesions. See Violin string adhesions.

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn)
1. The adhering or uniting of two surfaces or parts, especially the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound or adjacent layers of fascia.
Synonym(s): conglutination (1) .
2. In the pleural or peritoneal cavity, inflammatory bands that connect opposing serous surfaces.
3. Mutual attraction of unlike molecules.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]

adhesion

1. Abnormal union between body surfaces or other tissues. Adhesions do not occur if tissues are healthy and retain intact epithelial coverings. But if the ‘non-stick’ surfaces are deficient or diseased, the underlying tissue will readily heal together. Adhesions between peritoneum and bowel are common following abdominal surgery. These are the result of failure of physiological removal of fibrin (fibrinolysis) following injury to the mesothelial cell monolayer forming the peritoneum.
2. A fibrous band holding together normally separate bodily parts.

adhesion

ability of substances, for example cells, molecules, to stick (adhere) together.
  1. In mammalian systems, cell to cell binding may involve calcium-dependent adhesion molecules, such as CADHERINS and INTEGRINS; calcium-independent binding mediated by proteins of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN family and cell to cell surface carbohydrate-binding proteins, SELECTINS. Adhesion of cells to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX is mediated by calcium- and magnesium-dependent binding of integrins.
  2. Microbial adhesion may be non-specific, involving electrostatic interactions between the bacterium and host cell surfaces; or specific, involving recognition of receptors on the surface of host cells by molecules called ADHESINS. This type of adhesion is often a prelude to COLONIZATION of the host by the bacterium and PATHOGENICITY.
  3. Attraction of unlike molecules to each other, such as that between water and the walls of a XYLEM VESSEL in plants.

Adhesion

The joining or sticking together of parts of an organ that are not normally joined together.

adhesion,

n a lumpy scar that forms when at least two layers of soft tissue adhere as a result of trauma, thus interfering with free movement between and within the layers.

synechia

Adhesion of parts of the body. In the eye it refers to the iris. Note: also spelt synechiae.
annular synechia Adhesion of the entire pupillary margin of the iris to the capsule of the crystalline lens. Syn. ring synechia. See iris bombé; pupillary block.
anterior synechia Adhesion of the iris to the cornea. It may give rise to angle-closure glaucoma. Syn. goniosynechia (if at the AC angle). See inflammatory glaucoma; indentation gonioscopy; prolapse of the iris; Peter's anomaly; Rieger's syndrome.
posterior synechia Adhesion of the iris to the capsule of the crystalline lens. See iris bombé; iritis; uveitis.
ring synechia See annular synechia.

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn)
Process of binding to a surface or binding two surfaces using chemical bonds or micromechanical interlocks.
Synonym(s): adhesio.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]

adhesion (adh´zhən),

n 1. the attraction of unlike molecules for one another.
2. the molecular attraction existing between surfaces in close contact.
3. the condition in which a material sticks to itself or another material.
4. the abnormal joining of tissues, generally by fibrous connective tissue, to each other after repair of an injury.
adhesion, bacterial,
n a microbial surface antigen that frequently exists in the form of filamentous projections and binds to specific receptors on epithelial cell membranes.
adhesion, sublabial,
n the abnormal union of the sublabial mucosa of the upper lip to the alveolar process; usually present in a unilateral or bilateral cleft of the lip.

adhesion

union of two surfaces that are normally separate; also, any fibrous band that connects them. Surgery within the abdomen sometimes results in adhesions. As an organ heals, fibrous scar tissue forms around the incision. Fibrinous exudate and scar tissue may cling to the surface of adjoining organs, causing them to kink. Adhesions are usually painless and cause no difficulties, although occasionally they produce obstruction or malfunction by distorting the organ. They can also occur following peritonitis and other inflammatory conditions. They may also occur in the pleura, in the pericardium, and around the pelvic organs. Surgery is sometimes recommended to relieve adhesions.

bowel adhesion
see peritoneal adhesion (below).
cervical a's
adhesions in the uterine cervix; they usually result from infection and in mares encourage the development of pyometra.
interthalamic adhesion
the midline union of the two halves of the thalamus; during development of the brain the two thalami encroach into the primitive disk-shaped third ventricle transforming it into a ring.
intestinal adhesion
takes the form of nonelastic bands between loops of intestine or between the intestine and other organs, or of constricting bands around the intestine. They often cause no clinical signs. Long bands may cause intermittent colic due to obstruction of the intestinal lumen which is relieved spontaneously. When they are not relieved they are life-threatening. Cicatricial bands within the wall of the intestine are more likely to cause persistent, subacute abdominal pain. See also equine colic.
pericardial a's
fibrous adhesions that restrict the action of the heart and that follow late stages of pericarditis. This may cause cardiac inefficiency that leads to congestive heart failure.
peritoneal adhesion
part of the healing process in peritonitis, and disruption by surgical means or by violent activity may result in recrudescence of peritonitis. In the late cicatrization stage, adhesions may, by contraction, cause partial obstruction of the intestine and chronic or intermittent pain; a common cause of chronic colic in horses.
pleural adhesion
develops in the healing stages of pleurisy but is soon attenuated by constant thoracic movement and causes little respiratory insufficiency.
reticular adhesion
if extensive, can restrict the movements of the reticulum so much that the reticular groove cannot open to allow emptying of the rumen through the reticulo-omasal orifice. Chronic distention and frothy bloat result.
vaginal a's
common only in mares. Interfere with mating by preventing penetration of the penis, or with fertilization by blocking the movement of spermatozoa. Vaginal and rectal examination reveal bands of adhesion across the passage, or transverse partitions that completely block it. In the latter there may be an accumulation of exudate or secretion cranial to it. Three-dimensional adhesions convert the vagina into a solid mass with a similar obstructive effect. See also vaginal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subbaraman, Protein Deposition and Bacterial Adhesion to Conventional and Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lens Materials.
People in the biomaterial research community have been struggling for years to control bacterial adhesion," Schoenfisch said.
These properties are useful in investigations on specific biomedical applications, including evaluation of bacterial adhesion to the surfaces, and utilization of modified Pis as semipermeable membranes.
Cranberry juice apparently worked by inhibition of bacterial adhesion to host tissue, a unique and hitherto unknown anti-infective mechanism.
7], contribute to the formation of acquired pellicle, (16,17) and statherin, a salivary acidic phosphoprotein, and proline-rich proteins promote bacterial adhesion to tooth surfaces.
Actin accumulation at sites of bacterial adhesion to tissue cultures cells: basis of a new diagnostic test for enteropathogenic and enterohaemorragic Escherichia coli.
Nosocomial pulmonary infection: Possible etiologic significance of bacterial adhesion to endotracheal tubes.
Different types of microbiotas will be tested under different conditions and effects of samples from these experiments will be determined in a variety of bioassays such as barrier function, DNA damage, bacterial adhesion and immunomodulation in co cultures of lymphocytes and epithelial cells.
Using NO to prevent bacterial adhesion "is really exciting," he adds.
OTCB:CGXP), a biopharmaceutical company focused on infectious disease and dermatology today announced that recent in vitro testing has shown that its Cerashield[TM] antimicrobial coating applied to endotracheal tube segments was able to completely prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation in a 14 day continuous challenge with 10E6 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
This had better cytocompatibility, but alarmingly enhanced the bacterial adhesion as well.