bacterial adherence

bacterial adherence

[baktir′ēəl]
the process whereby bacteria attach themselves to cells or other surfaces before proliferating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both sugars had almost identical concentrations required to produce a 50% reduction of bacterial adherence.
One of the mechanisms that mediates bacterial adherence to skin is the interaction of pathogen carbohydrate-binding proteins with the skin, according to Vanden Heuvel.
1) There is also the potential for a reduction in dental caries when bacterial adherence is altered.
coli to human epithelial cells, with the bacterial adherence of E.
The same authors pointed also to the anthocyanin-induced decrease of the bacterial adherence to epithelial cells as the putative reason for the reduction of urinary tract colonization by pathogenic bacteria.
For example, the widely recognized benefits of cranberries in the prevention of UTIs are attributed to the presence of specific phytochemicals that inhibit bacterial adherence to the epithelial wall, including polyphenolic compounds such as anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins.
Cranberry juice has been touted for UTI prevention because it contains various chemicals that may prevent bacterial adherence to the bladder wall.
It seems that bacterial adherence occurs in a selective manner in different niches (24), and is isolate specific.
Reduced bacterial adherence to the catheter surface with heparin was demonstrated in three different catheter types [15], but the studies did not determine whether heparin clinically reduced UTIs.
Bacterial adherence to the upper respiratory tract of ferrets infected with influenza A virus.
coli in the urine samples, combined them with human bladder cells, and performed standard bacterial adherence assays to measure the number of bacteria that stuck to the bladder cells.