bacterial STI

bacterial STI

Any sexually transmitted infection caused by bacteria, such as syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Men Having Sex With Men Heterosexual Women and Men Injection Drug Users HIV-positive sexual partner HIV-positive sexual partner HIV-positive sexual partner Recent bacterial STI (sexually transmitted infection) Recent bacterial STI (sexually transmitted infection) Sharing injection equipment High number of sex partners High number of sex partners Recent drug treatment but currently injecting History of inconsistent or no condom use History of inconsistent or no condom use *** Commercial sex worker Commercial sex worker *** *** In high-prevalence area or network ***
Further, there has been a lack of dedicated funding for bacterial STI research at the national level.
Chlamydia has become the most common bacterial STI within the UK and last year over 180,000 new cases were reported.
A recent study found that sexual minority women are significantly more likely to have a bacterial STI than heterosexual women.
For example, reported rates of Chlamydia, a common bacterial STI, are higher among people aged 20-24 than they are among teens aged 15-19; among men Chlamydia rates are also higher among 25-29 year-olds than they are among 15-19 year-olds (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2010).
Gonorrhea is a bacterial STI which if left untreated can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and infertility in women.
The most important bacterial STI for which more precise data are needed is C.
The most common bacterial STI is chlamydia, the incidence of which rose by 107 per cent between 1995 and 2000 to 64,000 cases.
But at least 4 million Americans become infected with the bacterial STI chlamydia each year.
All bacterial STIs reported during adolescence elevated the risk of HIV.
Most importantly: (i) men who are uncircumcised face a higher risk of infection with HIV, syphilis, chancroid and gonorrhoea; (21, 22) (ii) the high prevalence of cervical ectopy in young women has been shown to increase susceptibility to HIV and chlamydia; (23, 24) (iii) bacterial STIs generally increase susceptibility to HIV, as do other STIs such as trichomoniasis and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2); (25) and (iv) bacterial vaginosis appears to be associated with the transmission of HIV and other STIs.
Similarities exist in terms of provision, which usually comprises specialised STI treatment services for bacterial STIs.