back-translation

back-translation

The process of translating a document that was translated from one language to another back to the original language. Back-translation is a mechanism that ensures that consent forms, surveys and other clinical trial documents are clear and accurate in the translated form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Back-Translation, Missing Data, Normality, and Reliability) which need long time to look at deeply, especially, for the researchers who are not well-established in research methods.
WellShare will arrange translation and back-translation.
It is worth remarking, however, that back-translation is more of a 'band-aid' applied across the problem of equivalence (Usunier 2009) and it does not solve the fundamental incongruity of categories between systems.
This technique involves four steps: (1) forward-translation of the English instrument into the target language by a bilingual individual, (2) back-translation of the translated instrument into English by another bilingual individual, (3) comparative review of the original English and back-translated English versions of the instrument for any inconsistencies, and (4) revision of the translated instrument through collaborative work by the bilingual translators (and possibly additional bilingual individuals).
The most beneficial activity has been back-translation class activity.
A back-translation from the Four Lectures on Theory of Relativity.
In other cases the problem arose in the back-translation itself, and was readily acknowledged:
Finally, the IASCF may wish to consider using the established methodology of back-translation.
A direct back-translation of this into English would be: 'When you see a red light stand here'.
Next, another native speaker performs a precise back-translation, providing a snapshot into how the message is being conveyed to the target audience.
The back-translation method is commonly used and is the recommended procedure for translating an instrument from the source language to another language (Cohen & Jones, 1990).
In designing the Arabic version of the SAS, guidelines proposed in the literature on the cross-cultural methodology (Brislin, 1980) were followed as closely as possible; for example, independent (blind) back-translations and educated translation.