bacitracin


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Related to bacitracin: Neosporin

bacitracin

 [bas″ĭ-tra´sin]
an antibacterial polypeptide elaborated by the licheniformis group of Bacillus subtilis; it is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and a few gram-negative bacteria; also used as the zinc salt. It is applied topically to the skin and eye.

bac·i·tra·cin

(bas'i-trā'sin),
An antibacterial antibiotic polypeptide of known chemical structure isolated from cultures of an aerobic, gram-positive, spore-bearing bacillus (member of the Bacillus subtilis group); active against hemolytic streptococci, staphylococci, and several types of gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped organisms; usually applied locally. Zinc bacitracin is also available.
[Bacillus + Margaret Tracy, source of orig. culture]

bacitracin

/bac·i·tra·cin/ (bas″ĭ-tra´sin) an antibacterial polypeptide elaborated by the licheniformis group of Bacillus subtilis that acts by interfering with bacterial cell wall synthesis; it is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and a few gram-negative bacteria; also used as the zinc salt.

bacitracin

(băs′ĭ-trā′sĭn)
n.
A polypeptide antibiotic obtained from a strain of a bacterium (Bacillus subtilis) and used as a topical ointment in the treatment of certain bacterial infections, especially those caused by cocci.

bacitracin

[bas′itrā′sin]
Etymology: L, bacillum + Tracy, surname of patient in whom toxin-producing bacillus species was isolated
an antibacterial.
indication A common component of topical antibiotic ointments used for treating skin infections.
contraindication Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects Skin rash.

bac·i·tra·cin

(bas'i-trā'sin)
An antibacterial antibiotic polypeptide of known chemical structure isolated from cultures of an aerobic, gram-positive, spore-bearing bacillus; active against hemolytic streptococci, staphylococci, and several types of gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped organisms; usually applied locally.
[Bacillus + Margaret Tracy, source of orig. culture]

bacitracin

An antibiotic derived from the bacterium Bacillus subtili s. It acts by interfering with the formation of the bacterial cell membrane and is highly effective against many organisms especially the HAEMOLYTIC streptococcus. Unfortunately, it is so liable to damage the kidneys that it must be confined to external use. Brand names of prparations containing bacitracin are Cicatrin and Polyfax.

bacitracin

topical antibacterial agent

bacitracin 

An antibiotic drug with similar properties to penicillin and effective principally against gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococci and Streptococci. It is mainly used in combination with other agents (e.g. polymyxin B) for treating external eye infections (e.g. blepharoconjunctivitis).

bac·i·tra·cin

(bas'i-trā'sin)
Antibacterial antibiotic polypeptide isolated from cultures of an aerobic, gram-positive, spore-bearing bacillus; active against hemolytic streptococci, staphylococci, and several types of gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped organisms; usually applied locally.

bacitracin

an antibacterial substance elaborated by the licheniformis group of Bacillus subtilis, found in a contaminated wound, and named after the patient, Margaret Tracy; useful in a wide range of infections and usually applied topically.
References in periodicals archive ?
marinus studies, parasite inhibition resulted from 25 [micro]g/mL of cyclohexamide (Ray 1966a), 10 mg/mL (10,000 [micro]g/mL) of bacitracin (Faisal et al.
A Bacitracin susceptibility can be helpful in differentiating Streptococcus pyogenes from other beta-streptococci.
Bacitracin was applied to the external jaw incisions.
For mild cases, a nonprescription antibiotic cream such as bacitracin is usually helpful.
Among the healthy quickies are Q-tips Treat&Go, individually wrapped cotton swabs dipped in Bacitracin antibiotic ointment for cuts and scrapes, plus two aimed at dental hygiene.
High prevalence of bacitracin resistance among enterococci isolated from humans stools and grocery store chicken in the United States.
The culture characteristics of the organism, specifically that it Was bacitracin disk resistant, that it did not hydrolyze pyrrolidonyl arylamide (PYR test), and that latex typing was group C and not group A, were confirmed by 3 high-complexity hospital laboratories that agreed to pretest test isolates.
human-medicine antibiotics currently used in livestock and poultry food include arsanilic acid, avoparcin, bacitracin, bam bermycin, chlortetracycline, erythromycin, furazolidone, glycopeptides, lincomycin, neomycin sulfate, nitrofurazone, 3-nitro-4-hydroxy phenylarsonic acid, oleandomycin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, procaine penicillin, sodium arsanilate, streptogramin, streptomycin, sulfamethazine, sulfaquinox-aline, sulfathiazole, tetracycline, tylosin, vancomycin, and virginiamycin;
Using local antibiotics like bacitracin and antifungal creams may help, but it's hard to reverse an ingrown, infected nail without an office surgical procedure using local anesthesia.
adviser to travelers throughout the world: "Assemble a medical kit for a dancer of any age that includes one-, three-, and five-inch tapes; Ace Bandages with metal clamps or in self-adhesive form; an over-the-counter medicine such as Tylenol or Advil (to be used sparingly, if at all), or an acetaminophen product if you are a nonaspirin user; an analgesic balm such as Kiehl's Body Rub; an antidiarrheal medication such as Kaopectate or Pepto-Bismol; Bacitracin, for minor cuts, burns, and scrapes; small scissors and tweezers; an antibiotic, such as Cipro or Neosporin; and a decongestant for allergies.
In Britain's case, the four antibiotics - Tysolin Phosphate, Bacitracin Zinc, Spiramycin and Virginiamycin - will be outlawed from July 1 1999.
1 mmol/L), bacitracin (1 g/L), N-ethylmaleimide (1 mmol/L),1,10-phenanthroline (1 mmol/L), EDTA (5 mmol/L), and diamide (5 mmol/L) [4-6].