bacillary


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bacillary

 [bas´ĭ-lar″e]
pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.
bacillary dysentery the most common and violent form of dysentery, caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella. It is most common in the tropics, the subtropics, and East Asia and can be fatal, especially among children. It can erupt anyplace where sanitation is poor and large groups of people, including carriers of the disease, are crowded together.

The disease is spread through the feces of carriers who have the bacteria in their intestines; such individuals may have diarrhea or dysentery or may seem perfectly well in spite of carrying the disease. Infection may come after eating or drinking from anything contaminated with bacteria from the feces of these carriers. Even touching something contaminated and then touching the mouth can cause infection. Flies also spread the disease.

Attacks of bacillary dysentery are always acute after the incubation period of a few days. Temperature may rise as high as 40°C (104°F), sometimes with symptoms of dehydration, shock, and delirium. Bowel movements may be as many as 30 to 40 a day. Running its normal course, without special medicines, it is usually over within a few weeks from its outset, although an attack in a child may be more serious and last longer.

Ampicillin is the drug of choice for sensitive strains of Shigella in the United States and is usually effective in relieving the symptoms and controlling bacillary dysentery in a day or two.

The greatest threat of dysentery is from deficient fluid volume and electrolyte imbalance, which must be corrected by the intravenous administration of fluids and electrolytes lost in the watery stools.

Although the usual dysenteric illness may last a few weeks if not treated with special medicines, symptoms of intestinal ulceration, diarrhea, and painful spasms in evacuating may in a few cases continue for a longer time.

ba·cil·lar

, bacillary (bas'i-lar, bas'i-lā-rē),
Shaped like a rod; consisting of rods or rodlike elements.

bacillary

/bac·il·la·ry/ (bas´ĭ-lar″e) pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.

bacillary

(băs′ə-lĕr′ē, bə-sĭl′ə-rē) also

bacillar

(bə-sĭl′ər, băs′ə-lər)
adj.
1. Shaped like a rod or rods.
2.
a. Consisting of small rods or rodlike structures.
b. Caused by, relating to, or resembling bacilli: bacillary dysentery.

ba·cil·lar

, bacillary (bas'i-lăr, -lar-ē)
Shaped like a rod; consisting of rods or rodlike elements.

bacillary

1. Rod-shaped.
2. Relating to, or caused by, a bacillus.

bacillary

pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.

bacillary hemoglobinuria
an acute, highly fatal toxemia of cattle and sheep caused by Clostridium haemolyticum (Cl. novyi type D). It is characterized by fever, hemoglobinuria and jaundice, and at postmortem examination by the presence of necrotic infarcts in the liver.
bacillary layer
layer of rods and cones in the retina.
bacillary necrosis
bacillary pyelonephritis
see contagious bovine pyelonephritis.
bacillary typhlitis
bacillary white diarrhea
References in periodicals archive ?
Bacillary angiomatosis associated with extensive esophageal polyposis: a new mucocutaneous manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS).
Histopathology of bacillary angiomatosis o f lymph node.
Though in the mouse model, only ~1 unit log reduction in peak lung bacillary load is achievable by BCG vaccine, the reduction is 2-3 log unit in immunized guinea pigs which provides a wider spectrum for evaluating pigs efficacies of the vaccine candidates (36,38).
The current edition of CME brings you a case of bacillary angiomatosis in an HIV-positive man; [1] a case of paraplegia that was not what it seemed to be; [2] an unusual presentation of cryptococcal laryngitis; [3] a report of ataxia as a side-effect of efavirenz use in children; [4] the value of endobronchial ultrasound; [5] the problem with a false-negative polymerase chain reaction test for HIV; [6] a case of metatstatic hepatocellular carcinoma in a pregnant woman; [7] and Kounis syndrome.
To the Editor: Shigella sonnei causes a bacillary dysentery called shigellosis.
Weather and the transmission of bacillary dysentery in Jinan, northern China: a time-series analysis.
The diagnosis must be proven on tissue biopsy because several conditions may mimic cutaneous KS including pyogenic granuloma, bacillary angiomatosis and dermatofibromata.
Recognising acute viral hepatitis in patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB being treated for TB is important because, the longer duration for normalization (during which time a less efficient modified treatment regimen incorporating non-hepatotoxic drugs is being used), will also facilitate disease transmission and development of drug resistance especially in patients with a high bacillary load.
Clinically, IPEH can be misdiagnosed as a mucocele, hemangioma, pyogenic granuloma, Kaposi sarcoma, angiosarcoma, Kimura disease, intravenous atypical vascular proliferation, endovascular papillary angioendothelioma, papular angioplasia, or bacillary angiomatosis.
Nees (Family: Acanthaceae) have been used in traditional systems of medicine for the treatment of hepatitis, bronchitis, colitis, cough, fever, mouth ulcers, sores, tuberculosis, bacillary dysentery, venomous snake bites, common cold, urinary tract infections, and acute diarrhea (Panossian et al.
Shigellosis, or bacillary dysentery, is an acute bacterial disease characterized mainly by diarrhea, fever, nausea, vomiting and cramps with transmission occurring through a direct or indirect fecal-oral route.
The appearance of the lesions, along with the history, led to the following possible diagnoses: bacillary angiomatosis, cutaneous cryptococcosis, nodular Kaposi sarcoma or cutaneous histoplasmosis.