bacillary


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bacillary

 [bas´ĭ-lar″e]
pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.
bacillary dysentery the most common and violent form of dysentery, caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella. It is most common in the tropics, the subtropics, and East Asia and can be fatal, especially among children. It can erupt anyplace where sanitation is poor and large groups of people, including carriers of the disease, are crowded together.

The disease is spread through the feces of carriers who have the bacteria in their intestines; such individuals may have diarrhea or dysentery or may seem perfectly well in spite of carrying the disease. Infection may come after eating or drinking from anything contaminated with bacteria from the feces of these carriers. Even touching something contaminated and then touching the mouth can cause infection. Flies also spread the disease.

Attacks of bacillary dysentery are always acute after the incubation period of a few days. Temperature may rise as high as 40°C (104°F), sometimes with symptoms of dehydration, shock, and delirium. Bowel movements may be as many as 30 to 40 a day. Running its normal course, without special medicines, it is usually over within a few weeks from its outset, although an attack in a child may be more serious and last longer.

Ampicillin is the drug of choice for sensitive strains of Shigella in the United States and is usually effective in relieving the symptoms and controlling bacillary dysentery in a day or two.

The greatest threat of dysentery is from deficient fluid volume and electrolyte imbalance, which must be corrected by the intravenous administration of fluids and electrolytes lost in the watery stools.

Although the usual dysenteric illness may last a few weeks if not treated with special medicines, symptoms of intestinal ulceration, diarrhea, and painful spasms in evacuating may in a few cases continue for a longer time.

ba·cil·lar

, bacillary (bas'i-lar, bas'i-lā-rē),
Shaped like a rod; consisting of rods or rodlike elements.

bacillary

/bac·il·la·ry/ (bas´ĭ-lar″e) pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.

bacillary

(băs′ə-lĕr′ē, bə-sĭl′ə-rē) also

bacillar

(bə-sĭl′ər, băs′ə-lər)
adj.
1. Shaped like a rod or rods.
2.
a. Consisting of small rods or rodlike structures.
b. Caused by, relating to, or resembling bacilli: bacillary dysentery.

ba·cil·lar

, bacillary (bas'i-lăr, -lar-ē)
Shaped like a rod; consisting of rods or rodlike elements.

bacillary

1. Rod-shaped.
2. Relating to, or caused by, a bacillus.

bacillary

pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.

bacillary hemoglobinuria
an acute, highly fatal toxemia of cattle and sheep caused by Clostridium haemolyticum (Cl. novyi type D). It is characterized by fever, hemoglobinuria and jaundice, and at postmortem examination by the presence of necrotic infarcts in the liver.
bacillary layer
layer of rods and cones in the retina.
bacillary necrosis
bacillary pyelonephritis
see contagious bovine pyelonephritis.
bacillary typhlitis
bacillary white diarrhea
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, this study shows a high proportion of DM among male patients with active TB, older age group and high sputum bacillary load.
Bacillary necrosis, a disease of larval and juvenile bivalve mollusks I.
Patients with high bacillary load were more susceptible to non-conversion as compared to those with low load.
Petri, "Cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and other infections due to rochalimaea," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
There were 9 (18%) Gramnegative bacillary isolates, including 3 (6%) Escherichia coli; 2 (4%) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and one isolate (2%) each of Proteus vulgaris, Enterobacteraerogenes, Klebsiella, and Haemophilus influenzae [Table-3].
Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: clinical characteristics in a case control study.
Rochalimaea henselae causes bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis.
Clinical, histologic, microbiologic, and biochemical characterization of the causative agent of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis: a rickettsial illness with features of bartonellosis.
Background & objectives: Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) or neutrophils infiltrate to the inflammatory sites and phagocytose mycobacteria thereby inhibiting the bacillary spread initially until the accumulated macrophages get activated.
As a side note, the authors say that bacillary angiomatosis ("cat scratch disease") infects humans when flea excrement containing the bug Bartonella henselae gets under the skin along with the cat scratch.
When human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became more prevalent in the 1990s, a newly recognized disease called bacillary angiomatosis was recognized.
the defendant meat packing company processed chitterlings (pig intestines) that were eventually sold to the plaintiffs who became ill with bacillary dysentery.