baby bottle tooth decay


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baby bottle tooth decay

a dental condition that occurs in children between 12 months and 3 years of age as a result of being given a bottle at bedtime, resulting in prolonged exposure of the teeth to milk or juice. Caries are formed because pools of milk or juice in the mouth break down to lactic acid and other decay-causing substances. Preventive measures include elimination of the bedtime feeding or substitution of water for milk or juice in the nighttime bottle. Formerly called nursing bottle caries.
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Baby bottle tooth decay

ba·by bot·tle tooth de·cay

(bābē botĕl tūth dĕ-kā)
Abnormally high level of dental caries affecting the teeth of children usually younger than 4 years of age, related to prolonged use of a baby bottle containing cariogenic liquids.
Synonym(s): baby bottle syndrome, nursing bottle caries.

baby bottle tooth decay,

n a dental condition that occurs in children from 1 to 3 years of age as a result of being given a bottle at bedtime, resulting in prolonged exposure of the teeth to milk, formula, or juice with a high sugar content. Dental caries results from the breakdown of sugars to lactic acid and other decay-causing substances. Newer term is early childhood caries.
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Baby bottle tooth decay.
References in periodicals archive ?
This condition is often called early childhood caries (cavities) or baby bottle tooth decay.
Many babies experience baby bottle tooth decay when their teeth are frequently exposed to sugary liquids such as breast milk, formula or fruit juice for long periods of time.
Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by prolonged exposure of infant's teeth to liquids that contain sugar, like milk (including breast milk), formula, fruit juice and other sweetened drinks.
She adds that it is estimated that 5-10 percent of young children have baby bottle tooth decay, a severe form of tooth decay, and this percentage triples for children of "low income" families.
22 /PRNewswire/ -- Washington Dental Service Foundation, the state's largest foundation dedicated exclusively to improving oral health, has given $27,000 to the Washington Association of Local Women, Infants and Children (WALWICA) for continued funding of the statewide baby bottle tooth decay prevention project.