baby boomer


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Related to baby boomer: Generation Y
A member of the post-World War II ‘baby boom’ generation, which corresponds to those individuals born after the end of WWII—1945 until 1964

baby boomer

Any person born in the years immediately following the end of World War II (usually defined as the years 1946–1964) when birth rates in the U.S. were unusually high.
References in periodicals archive ?
This group is not only less Democratic than baby boomers as a whole, but also significantly less Democratic than the U.
Having grown up in an environment where retirement preparedness is a hot topic, more than 70 percent of Echo Boomers are concerned about having enough money for retirement, a degree of concern similar to the about-to-retire Baby Boomers (78 percent).
In doing so, Baby Boomers are overturning long-standing assumptions about working until age 65, calling for dramatic changes in current employment practices, and proving that retirement and working are not mutually exclusive.
Across the sexes Baby Boomer women are more concerned then men about this issue (73% vs.
About the Del Webb Baby Boomer Survey The Del Webb Baby Boomer Survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of PulteGroup from December 1-8, 2014 among 1,020 single, female U.
This article is part of an ongoing series analyzing how baby boomers -- those born from 1946 to 1964 in the U.
The baby boomer generation, my own, is content, if of the Left, to live out our remaining years upon the work and upon the entitlements created by our parents, and to entail the costs upon our children--to tax industry out of the country, to tax wealth away from its historical role and use as the funder of innovation.
Baby Boomers -- along with Generation X employees -- are distinctly less engaged at work than other generations.
According to the CDC statement, "1 in 30 baby boomers has been infected with hepatitis C, and most don't know it.
Finding answers to these compelling questions is of the utmost strategic importance for a credit union that might otherwise implode from the demographic pressure of its aging baby boomer membership.
The average cost for a baby boomer patient was $11,900.