beta-adrenergic receptors

(redirected from b-adrenergic receptors)

β-ad·re·ner·gic re·cep·tors

adrenergic receptors in effector tissues capable of selective activation and blockade by drugs; conceptually derived from the ability of certain agents, such as propranolol, to block only some adrenergic receptors and of other agents, such as isoproterenol, to activate only the same adrenergic receptors. Such receptors are designated as β-receptors. Their activation results in physiologic responses such as increases in cardiac rate and force of contraction (β1), and relaxation of bronchial and vascular smooth muscle (β2) contained in skeletal muscle.

β-ad·re·ner·gic re·cep·tors

(adrĕ-nĕrjik rĕ-septŏrz)
Those in effector tissues capable of selective activation and blockade by drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sympathomimetics suppress uterus contractions by stimulating b-adrenergic receptors.
Tachycardia developing in relation to the stimulation of b-adrenergic receptors is a serious side effect and in some cases may require cessation of the treatment.
Amiodarone, as a Class III antiarrhythmic agent, can prolong the effective refractory period of myocardial cells, shorten the interval between action potentials, decelerate conduction and terminate reentrant excitation by non-competitively binding a- and b-adrenergic receptors on the myocardial cell membrane.