azotemia


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Related to azotemia: prerenal azotemia, nephritic syndrome

azotemia

 [az″o-te´me-ah]
an excess of nitrogenous waste products in the blood. (This is the most precise name for the condition, although in the literature it is commonly referred to as uremia.) See also uremia. adj., adj azote´mic.

az·o·te·mi·a

(az'ō-tē'mē-ă),
An abnormal increase in concentration of urea and other nitrogenous substances in the blood plasma.
See also: uremia.
[azo- (azote) + G. haima, blood]

azotemia

/az·o·te·mia/ (az″o-te´me-ah) uremia; an excess of urea or other nitrogenous compounds in the blood.

azotemia

(ăz′ə-tē′mē-ə, ā′zə-)
n.
See uremia.

az′o·te′mic (-mĭk) adj.

azotemia

[az′ōtē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Fr, azote, nitrogen; Gk, haima, blood
retention of excessive amounts of nitrogenous compounds in the blood. This toxic condition is caused by failure of the kidneys to remove urea from the blood and is characteristic of uremia. Also spelled azotaemia. See also uremia. azotemic, adj.

azotemia

Nephrology A higher than normal blood urea–BUN or other nitrogen-containing compounds in the blood; ↑ BUN may be: (1) prerenal, due to ↓ renal blood flow–with ↓ glomerular filtration rate–GFR and/or excess urea production, seen in dehydration, shock, ↓ blood volume, and CHF; (2) renal, with ↓ GFR due to acute or chronic renal failure; (3) postrenal, due to urinary tract obstruction or perforation with extravasation of urine; ↓ BUN occurs in pregnancy–due to ↑ GFR, malnutrition, high fluid intake, severe liver disease–↓ protein production. See Uremia.

Azotemia

The presence of excess nitrogenous wastes in the blood.

azotemia

an excess of nitrogen-containing compounds in the blood. See also uremia.

postrenal azotemia
is caused by reduced renal blood flow caused by increased pressure within the renal collecting system, e.g. hydronephrosis and urine retention from a variety of causes.
prerenal azotemia
is due to extrarenal causes that reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, e.g. dehydration, shock, reduced cardiac output, decreased plasma albumin osmotic pressure.
primary renal azotemia
results from loss of renal functional parenchyma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypercreatininemia and prerenal azotemia are predictors of death in patients with unstable angina and LBBB within 14 days of the onset of the disease.
Major Finding: Within the dementia group, the positive predictive values for emergency transfer were 61% for azotemia, 61.
The combination o frecent chemotherapy, his azotemia, (8) and his metabolic acidosis (9) likely predisposed him to invasive zygomycosis.
An ambulatory patient with congestive heart failure and azotemia is precariously balanced by weekly visits and occasional furosemide injections.
In patients with severe heart failure whose renal function may depend on the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, treatment with NATRECOR([R]) may be associated with azotemia.
Our patient is an example in which renal metastasis produced laboratory changes, including hematuria, azotemia, and proteinuria.
Hypotension: Epaned can cause symptomatic hypotension, sometimes complicated by oliguria, progressive azotemia, acute renal failure, or death.
In a field trial (56 day) performed in dogs, (13) the adverse effect incidence (at least one occurrence reported per dog) was poor appetite (38%), lethargy (33%), diarrhea (30%), dyspnea (29%), azotemia (14%), weakness and ataxia (13%), pleural effusion (10%), syncope (9%), cough (7%), sudden death (6%), ascites (6%), and heart murmur (3%).
Other associated abnormalities include saccular (berry) aneurysms of the circle of Willis (10% to 16% of autopsy cases and as many as 41% of patients undergoing cerebral angiography), aortic root abnormalities, mitral valve prolapse, hypertension, azotemia, proteinuria, lumbar and abdominal pain, and abdominal and inguinal hernias.
To resolve the azotemia and hydronephrosis, we conducted a ureteral stent insertion and percutaneous nephrostomy.