azo dyes


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azo dyes

dyes in which the azo group is the chromophore and joins benzene or naphthalene rings; they include a large number of biologic stains (for example, Congo red and oil red O); also used clinically to promote epithelial growth in the treatment of ulcers, burns, and other wounds; many have anticoagulant action.

a·zo dyes

(āzō dīz)
Dyes in which the azo group is the chromophore and joins benzene or naphthalene rings; they include a large number of biologic stains (e.g., Congo red and oil red O); also used clinically to promote epithelial growth in the treatment of ulcers, burns, and other wounds; many have anticoagulant action.

azo dyes

a group of synthetic dyes with weak antimicrobial properties. Examples are phenazopyridine and scarlet red.
References in periodicals archive ?
Papita, Plant-mediated synthesis of silver-nanocomposite as novel effective azo dye adsorbent, Appl.
Aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a newly isolated yeast Candida tropicaiis TL-F1.
Similarly three types of structurally different four azo dyes Reactive Black 5, Reactive Blue BRS, Direct Blue and Disperse Yellow were used for enrichment of the medium to isolate bacteria.
Several authors like Oforka and Oranusi (20) have reported decolorization of azo dyes like Ponceau 4R dye and carmoisine by Escherichia coli, the strain used in their study was originally obtained from the Department of Microbiology at the University of Port Harcourt in Nigeria and was isolated from the natural human intestinal flora.
The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact in microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.
Modified graphene quantum dots have been used in this research as nanocatalyst to synthesize azo dyes.
It has been found that purified forms of many azo dyes are directly mutagenic and carcinogenic (Chen, 2002).
Removal of a hazardous azo dye (Basic Red 46) from aqueous solution by princess tree leaf.
They are: Erythrosin included in the class of xanthene dyes; Blue indigotine included in the indigotin class of dyes, Patent Blue V, Fast Green and Brilliant Blue in class of triphenylmethane dyes, Bordeaux Red, Ponceau 4R, Red 40, Azorubine, Tartrazine Yellow and Sunset Yellow, included in the class of azo dyes (POLONIO; PERES, 2009).
Impact of ozonation on subsequent treatment of azo dye solutions.
According to reports, certain types of azo dyes can break down to form "aromatic amines" when there is prolonged contact with the skin.