pyridine

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pyridine

 [pir´ĭ-dēn]
1. a toxic, colorless, liquid hydrocarbon usually derived from coal tar and used as a laboratory and industrial intermediate.

pyr·i·dine

(pir'i-dēn, -din),
A colorless volatile liquid of empyreumatic odor and burning taste, resulting from the dry distillation of organic matter containing nitrogen; used as an industrial solvent, in analytic chemistry, and for denaturing alcohol.

pyridine

/pyr·i·dine/ (pir´ĭ-din)
1. a coal tar derivative, C5H5N, derived also from tobacco and various organic matter.
2. any of a group of substances homologous with normal pyridine.

pyridine

(pĭr′ĭ-dēn′)
n.
A flammable, colorless or yellowish liquid base, C5H5N, having a penetrating odor and serving as the parent compound of many biologically important derivatives. It is used as a solvent and in the manufacture of various agricultural chemicals, rubber products, water repellents, dyes, and drugs.

py·rid′ic (pī-rĭd′ĭk) adj.

pyridine

1. a substance derived from coal tar and also from tobacco and various organic materials. Used in industry as a solvent and in the synthesis of organic compounds.
2. any of a group of substances homologous with normal pyridine. The pyridines are serious poisons causing damage to most organs especially nervous and respiratory systems and skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ren, "Method for Preparation of Azine," CN1068107 (Jan 20, 1993).
Delavarenne, "Method for Preparing Azines and Hydrazones," US Patent 3972878 (Aug 3, 1976).
Publications such as residents' association newsletters, fete programmes and parish mag- azines
The most popular purchases were travel, accommodation or holidays (59%), tickets for events (39%), books, mag- azines, e-learning or training material (38%) and music or CDs (36%).
The Hungarian-speaking Roman Catholics publish several mag azines, including Remeny (hope) and Katolicus Naptar, the Catholic annual.
A huge amount of recyclable waste is generated at airport terminals, from people waiting for flights and passengers getting off planes with newspapers or mag azines.