azeotrope

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Related to azeotropes: boiling point, Azeotropic distillation

azeotrope

 [a´ze-o-trōp″]
a mixture of two substances that has a constant boiling point and cannot be separated by fractional distillation. adj., adj azeotrop´ic.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā-zē'ō-trōp),
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without a change in proportion of the substances either in the liquid or the vapor phase, for example, 95% ethanol (actually 94.9% by volume, the rest being water).
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]

azeotrope

/azeo·trope/ (a´ze-o-trōp″) a mixture of two substances that has a constant boiling point and cannot be separated by fractional distillation.azeotrop´ic

azeotrope

A mixture of two or more liquids, which boils without change in proportion in either the liquid or vapour phase, meaning they cannot be separated by distillation.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā'zē-ō-trōp)
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]

azeotrope

a mixture of two substances that has a constant boiling point and cannot be separated by fractional distillation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If there is an azeotrope, the following condition applies (Sandler, 1999b) for both the isothermal and isobaric cases:
b) If there is an azeotrope, calculate its composition ([x.
A criterion for existence of a positive azeotrope is (Missen, 2005):
there is an azeotrope, in agreement with the experimental result.
Although this value is between the values at the two experimental points that lie on either side of the indicated azeotrope point, a precise comparison with an experimental value is difficult, because the line connecting these two points on a [y.
Taking the Poynting correction (see assumption A6) into account, as was done by Orye and Prausnitz (1965), would change the calculated value very slightly; estimated values at the azeotrope are 1.
If an azeotrope exists, it is a minimum-boiling azeotrope for a positive deviation from Raoult's law.
Since Criterion (37) is satisfied, there is a minimum-boiling azeotrope, in agreement with the experimental result.
The method described here to obtain azeotrope coordinates for binary systems gives results that are consistent with a [g.
The procedure given here for the calculation of azeotrope coordinates can also be used in polyazeotropy, the relatively rare occurrence of more than one azeotrope at a given T or P.