axillary nerve


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ax·il·lar·y nerve

[TA]
nerve that arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus in the axilla, passes laterally and posteriorly through the quadrangular space with the posterior circumflex humeral artery; muscular branches pass to the teres minor and wind around the surgical neck of the humerus to the deltoid; terminates as the superior lateral brachial cutaneous nerve.

axillary nerve

one of the last two branches of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus before the posterior cord becomes the radial nerve. It divides into a posterior branch and an anterior branch. The posterior branch innervates the teres minor, part of the deltoideus, and part of the skin overlying the deltoideus; the anterior branch innervates the deltoideus. Some fibers of the nerve also supply the capsule of the shoulder joint.

ax·il·lar·y nerve

(ak'sil-ār-ē nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus in the axilla, passes laterally and posteriorly through quadrangular space with the posterior circumflex artery, winding round the surgical neck of the humerus to supply the deltoid and teres minor muscles, terminating as the superior lateral brachial cutaneous nerve.
Synonym(s): nervus axillaris [TA] .

axillary

of or pertaining to the armpit.

axillary lymph node
buried deeply between the shoulder muscles and the chest wall; palpable in the living animal only when significantly enlarged and hard.
axillary nerve
see Table 14.
axillary nerve lesion
characterized by atrophy of the deltoid muscle.
axillary nodular necrosis
small, round, hard nodules at the girth or near the axilla in horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Samardzic M, Rasulic L, Grujicic D, Milicic B: Results of nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous and axillary nerves.
This case describes a rare triad in a teenager consisting of a HAGL lesion, rotator cuff tear, and axillary nerve palsy that resulted from an anterior shoulder dislocation.
d)- (e)) Poor clinical outcome especially in forward elevation due to axillary nerve neurapraxia.
Dr Price describes a new alternative to the interscalene block (ISB), the so-called 'shoulder block' (ShB) (1) which involves selective blockade of both the suprascapular and axillary nerves.
Nijs S, Sermon A, Broos P, Intramedullary fixation of proximal humerus fractures: do locking bolts endanger the axillary nerve or the ascending branch of the anterior circumflex artery?
It may be possible to prolong duration in this group by using a suprascapular nerve catheter 2 and single-shot axillary nerve block.
The axillary nerve should at least be palpated to note its position for protection during the remainder of the case.
The lateral cord gives off the lateral branch of the median nerve and terminates as the musculocutaneous nerve; the medial cord gives off the medial branch of the median nerve and terminates as the ulnar nerve; and the posterior cord gives off the axillary nerve and terminates as the radial nerve.
No descriptions of axillary nerve block were available in the literature, so a technique for blocking this nerve as it travels across the posterior surface of the humerus was developed and is described along with a discussion of the author's initial clinical experience
The important structures at risk are the axillary nerve and the posterior humeral circumflex artery, the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, and the cephalic vein, biceps tendon, and musculocutaneous nerve.