axillary dissection


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Related to axillary dissection: axillary lymph node dissection

dissection

 [dĭ-sek´shun]
1. the act of dissecting.
2. a part or whole of an organism prepared by dissecting.
aortic dissection a dissecting aneurysm of the aorta; the usual site is the thoracic aorta. There are two types, classified according to anatomical location: Type A involves the ascending aorta; Type B originates in the descending aorta. Acute aortic dissection is often fatal within one month of onset. Surgical treatment may be delayed in aneurysms involving the descending aorta until the blood pressure has been controlled and edema and friability of the aorta are diminished. The usual course of treatment for an aneurysm of the ascending aorta is immediate surgery. The surgical procedure for either type is aimed at either repairing the intimal tear or removing the affected portion of the aorta. This may be done by suturing the separated aortic layers back together or by removing the damaged section of the aorta and replacing it with a synthetic graft.
axillary dissection (axillary lymph node dissection) surgical removal of axillary lymph nodes, done as part of radical mastectomy.
blunt dissection separation of tissues along natural lines of cleavage, by means of a blunt instrument or finger.
lymph node dissection lymphadenectomy.
lymph node dissection, retroperitoneal (RPLND) retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy.
sharp dissection separation of tissues by means of the sharp edge of a knife or scalpel, or with scissors.

axillary dissection

References in periodicals archive ?
The use of CK IHC on NSLNs from axillary dissections did not add additional diagnostic or staging information, and this approach should be reserved for the evaluation of SLNs only.
Complications after axillary dissection Minor complications Numbness in distribution of intercostobrachial nerve (70%) Seroma (30%) Reduction in ROM of shoulder (25%) Lymphoedema (depends on the number nodes removed: may be minor or major complication) Major complications (infrequent) Thrombosis axillary vein Injury to motor nerve in axilla
Standard management of the axilla in breast cancer is a complete axillary dissection (AD), which provides both treatment and information on nodal status (5-8).
The lower rates of axillary dissection in this group lead to understaging of the disease, inadequate treatment, and poorer outcomes, he added.
Long-term morbidity following axillary dissection in breast cancer patients--clinical assessment, significance for life quality and the impact of demographic, oncologic and therapeutic factors.
atients with clinically node-negative axillae having neoadjuvant chemotherapy to have SLNB before commencement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and, if negative, to have no further axillary procedure; while those who are SLNB positive proceed, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, to a further SLNB and axillary dissection.
We present a case of tumoral melanosis involving multiple nodes of an axillary dissection done for metastatic melanoma of unknown primary.
The currently accepted treatment for early-stage breast cancer in women with breast implants--skin-sparing mastectomy with axillary dissection and implant exchange followed by WBI--carries the 55% risk of capsular contracture due to the formation of collagenous scar tissue around the implant, Dr.
Twenty-three of 35 patients (66%) in group B were spared an axillary dissection.
Alberti foresees that the best use of nanometastases as a prognostic indicator would be as one of the factors used to assess which sentinel node-positive patients should receive a complete axillary dissection (Ann.
Standard axillary dissection has long been the standard of care for breast cancer patients, but up to 83% of women receiving this treatment experience at least one arm problem in the first three months post-surgery, and for 79%, problems remain at 18 months.
The answer may depend on the amount of axillary dissection previously done.