avirulence


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avirulence

 [a-vir´u-lens]
lack of virulence; lack of competence of an infectious agent to produce pathologic effects. adj., adj avir´ulent.

avirulence

/avir·u·lence/ (a-vir´u-lens) lack of virulence; lack of competence of an infectious agent to produce pathologic effects.avir´ulent

avirulence

lack of virulence; lack of competence of an infectious agent to produce pathological effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geographic distribution of avirulence genes in rice blast fungus in Yunnan Province, China.
Regarding avirulence Avr gene correspondent to Pl2 gene in P halstedii, it seems that Avr gene stimulates less virulent spectrum and more aggressive characteristics in races 304 and 314 than races 704 and 714.
The plant's resistance (R) gene product acts as a signaling receptor for the pathogen's avirulence (Avr) gene product in the presence of resistance-regulating factors such as RAR1 and SGT1, leading to a form of cell death termed hypersensitive response (Rowland et al.
A resistance gene product of the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeats class can form a complex with bacterial avirulence proteins in vivo.
Plant species `learn' to recognise the product of the avirulence gene, and to activate their defensive mechansims.
Homology and functional similarity of an hrp-linked pathogenicity locus, dspEF, of Erwinia amylovora and the avirulence locus avrE of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato.
Avirulence genes and mechanisms of genetic instability in the rice blast fungus.
1996), and H13 (Zantoko and Shukle, 1997) show each of these resistant genes has a corresponding avirulence gene in Hessian fly.
Ample theoretical bases exist for the idea that in most cases a "good parasite" will evolve toward avirulence among members of a reservoir taxon with which it has a long-term evolutionary relationship (19), ahhough some recent discussions suggest the contrary (20).
0, transmission is strong enough for many strains to eliminate susceptibles altogether (reach a boundary equilibrium); as long as this is true, only less virulent strains can invade, and evolution moves towards avirulence.
Flor, 1971) studied the interaction between flax and the fungal pathogen (Melampsora lini) and reported that flax genes for resistance were dominant and rust genes for virulence were recessive and finally concluded that pathogens contain a mixture of molecules encoded by dominant avirulence (Avr) genes that generate defence responses in plants carrying the corresponding R gene (3).