avidity

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avidity

 [ah-vid´ĭ-te]
1. eagerness, or a strong attraction for something.
2. in immunology, an imprecise measure of the strength of antigen-antibody binding based on the rate at which the complex is formed.

a·vid·i·ty

(ă-vid'ĭ-tē),
The binding strength of an antibody for an antigen.
[L. avidus, greedy, eager fr. aveo, to crave]

avidity

/avid·i·ty/ (ah-vid´ĭ-te)
1. the strength of an acid or base.
2. in immunology, an imprecise measure of the strength of antigen-antibody binding based on the rate at which the complex is formed. Cf. affinity (3).

avidity

(ə-vĭd′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. avidi·ties

avidity

[avid′itē]
Etymology: L, avidus, eager
an inexact measure of the binding strength of antibodies to multiple antigenic determinants on natural antigens.

avidity

The degree of stability of an antibody’s binding with its antigen, which is a function of the number of shared binding sites and the binding energy of the antibody and antigen, which is the sum of the binding affinities of the combining sites on the antibody.

avidity

Immunology The degree of stability of an antibody's binding with its antigen, which is a function of the number of shared binding sites and the binding energy of an antibody and antigen–the sum of the binding affinities of the combining sites on the antibody. Cf Affinity.

a·vid·i·ty

(ă-vid'i-tē)
A measure of the binding strength of a multivalent antibody to a multivalent antigen.
See also: affinity
[L. avidus, greedy, eager fr. aveo, to crave]

avidity

in immunology, an imprecise measure of the strength of antibody-antigen binding based on the rate at which the complex is formed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, interfering antibodies can have a wide range of avidities to the antigen compared with the reagent antibodies (i.
The magnitude of immunoassay interference would be dependent on the assay format and the relative affinities/ avidities of interfering antibodies and their titer.
The presence of interfering antibodies could disrupt this binding reaction, and the magnitude of disruption would be dependent on factors such as the titer of interfering antibodies, their avidities and reaction times, and the location(s) of antibody binding site(s).