aversive

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aversive

/aver·sive/ (ah-ver´siv) characterized by or giving rise to avoidance; noxious.

aversive

(ə-vûr′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Causing avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior by using an unpleasant or punishing stimulus, as in techniques of behavior modification.

a·ver′sive·ly adv.
a·ver′sive·ness n.

a·ver·sive

(ă-vĕŕsiv)
Denotes type of therapy using unpleasant stimuli that seeks to cause a patient to avoid one or more transgressive behaviors.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is reflected in the low (and close to zero) regression coefficient of race regression coefficient for affect on aversiveness to tobacco companies.
Relatively less important are the effect of household size, and 1983 marital status, along with respondents' approval of the uses of credit and their risk aversiveness.
Macmillan, Forness, and Trumball (1973), for instance, appear to have defined aversiveness functionally:
This implies that the aversiveness of a loss decreases as the time until its occurrence increases (see Lerman, Addison, & Kodak, 2006, for an applied demonstration).
Instead of attempting to determine the appropriateness of an intervention based on its name, structure, or presumed aversiveness, perhaps researchers should systematically determine the effectiveness of function-based interventions.
Briefly, their purpose is to decrease aversiveness and increase the reinforcement for teachers and administrators.
The effect of swim stress administered during CS preexposure on later conditioning argues against the swim stress influencing the perceived aversiveness of the US (i.
Equally and perhaps most important, it is a fact that physical resistance itself actually increases the aversiveness of a dental exam or treatment exponentially; therefore, the process of teaching the patient to resist less will have the added effect of making the experience less aversive--for the patient and for the dental team.
Because the previous Demand condition showed decreases in rate, trend, and level of problem behavior, it was believed that the task aversiveness was reduced due to instructor attention.
One was to improve the quality of their emotional relationship and thus to remove one source of chronic aversiveness (the tension between them).
In the current investigation, we did not collect data on the aversiveness of demands or the quality of escape from those demands; however, these variables may have played a crucial role in response allocation.