aversive

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aversive

/aver·sive/ (ah-ver´siv) characterized by or giving rise to avoidance; noxious.

aversive

(ə-vûr′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Causing avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior by using an unpleasant or punishing stimulus, as in techniques of behavior modification.

a·ver′sive·ly adv.
a·ver′sive·ness n.

a·ver·sive

(ă-vĕŕsiv)
Denotes type of therapy using unpleasant stimuli that seeks to cause a patient to avoid one or more transgressive behaviors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The elevated T-maze allows the measurement of two kinds of aversively motivated behaviors namely, inhibitory avoidance (time the animal takes to leave the enclosed arm) and one-way escape (time taken to leave the open arm).
Similarly, in the case of aversively conditioned odors, the slugs cannot discriminate between structurally similar odorant molecules if they are injected with an NOS inhibitor just prior to the memory retention test (Sakura et al, 2004).
CRB1s are often behavioral excesses that aversively stimulate persons in the client's life, but may also be behavioral or motivational deficits that negatively impact the client's social relationships.
certainly cannot be expected to react aversively to an excessive
but are far less likely to react nearly so aversively to the experience
When conflicts arise, one or both partners may respond aversively by nagging, complaining, distancing, or becoming violent until the other gives in, creating a coercive cycle that each partner contributes to and maintains.
He turns what I take him to understand as the situated Americanness of this term (a term literally applicable to Cavell's father, come to these shores as part of the Jewish diaspora from Eastern Europe) into a generalizing window into how to be human is to be "cast, both with others and with ourselves, between acknowledgement and avoidance, between accepting the common as our home, and aversively asserting our own independence" (237).
A functional behavioristic approach to aversively motivated behavior: Predatory imminence as a determinant of the topography of defensive behavior.
Aversively stimulated aggression: Some parallels and difference in research with animals and humans.
aversively conditioned stimuli) may trigger an emotional response 'prior' to full object representation via direct links between the thalamus and amygdala (LeDoux, 1995).
Psychopharmacology, of aversively motivated behavior (pp.
203-4) that if I am aversively conditioned to act morally, I remain morally responsible, but if I am aversively conditioned to act immorally, I do not.