aversive


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aversive

/aver·sive/ (ah-ver´siv) characterized by or giving rise to avoidance; noxious.

aversive

(ə-vûr′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Causing avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior by using an unpleasant or punishing stimulus, as in techniques of behavior modification.

a·ver′sive·ly adv.
a·ver′sive·ness n.

a·ver·sive

(ă-vĕŕsiv)
Denotes type of therapy using unpleasant stimuli that seeks to cause a patient to avoid one or more transgressive behaviors.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is by modulating the activity of the mPFC and basal amygdala that these double-projecting hippocampal neurons contribute to the acquisition and retrieval of fear memory for a context associated with an aversive event.
2011; Ruiz, Luciano, Vizcaino-Torres, & Sanchez, 2012; Ruiz & Perete, 2015), the protocol advanced from trials with neutral experiences to trials with aversive experiences related to both experimental tasks.
Both appetitive and aversive desires result in an emotional reaction to either approach or avoid (Lee & Lang, 2009).
Specifically, this should include both the perceived strength and duration of each aversive attribute (Question 2).
In that work, the time courses corresponding to the amygdala were extracted and correlation maps were computed between these time courses and those corresponding to all the other voxels, with the purpose of describing how the amygdala's activity modulates the rest of the regions when processing aversive emotions.
Part I provides a theoretical overview of aversive racism theory,
After the IAT task participants were randomly assigned into image condition (Pairing of images of cigarette with aversive images of potential health consequences) and text condition (Pairing of images of cigarette with aversive texts of potential health consequences).
As the client responds less to aversive stimuli, aversives may have to increase in duration or intensity to have an effective impact (Lovaas & Favell, 1987).
Many aversive racists explicitly support egalitarian principles and believe themselves to be non-prejudiced [but] also unconsciously harbor negative feelings and beliefs about Blacks and other historically disadvantaged groups.
At first glance, aversive intervention may seem benign, but one does not have to look very far to see the need for concern when clinicians choose to use aversive intervention as part of a behavior modification plan.
Within the contextualist approach it is not the anxiety, sadness, and/or aversive thoughts and memories that are pathological, rather the pathology lies in the avoidance strategies (Follette, 1994; Pistorello, Follette, & Hayes, 2000; Walser & Hayes, 1998).
The scientists blame this tendency to deepen losses and lock in early gains on the regret aversive nature of investors.