avascular

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avascular

 [a-vas´ku-ler]
not vascular; bloodless.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ă-vas'kyū-lăr, ā-vas'kyū-lăr),
Without blood or lymphatic vessels; may be a normal state, as in certain forms of cartilage, or the result of disease.
Synonym(s): nonvascular

avascular

/avas·cu·lar/ (a-vas´ku-ler) not vascular; bloodless.

avascular

(ā-văs′kyə-lər)
adj.
Not associated with or supplied by blood vessels.

a·vas′cu·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

avascular

[āvas′kyələr]
Etymology: Gk, a, without; L, vasculum, vessel
1 pertaining to a tissue area that is not receiving a sufficient supply of blood. The reduced supply may be the result of blockage by a blood clot or of the deliberate stoppage of flow during surgery or during control of a hemorrhage.
2 pertaining to a kind of tissue that does not have blood vessels.

avascular

adjective Without blood vessels; lacking an adequate blood supply.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ā-vas'kyū-lăr)
Without blood or lymphatic vessels.

avascular

Lacking blood vessels.

avascular

without a blood supply. avascular necrosis death of tissue due to lack of blood supply, usually referring to bone, following injury. Other causes in bone include hyperbaric exposure (diving), excessive intake of corticosteroids or alcohol, and some diseases. Commonly occurs after fracture of the femoral neck, leading to death of the femoral head. Also seen in fractures of the scaphoid bone in the wrist or of the head of the humerus. Often leads to osteoarthritis.

avascular

non-vascular, e.g. a tissue area deprived of its blood supply

avascular

not vascular; bloodless.

avascular necrosis of the femoral head
avascular chorion
the normally avascular and villous tips of the chorioallantoic membranes in pig, sheep and cattle placentas; colored white to brown, wrinkled; called also the necrotic tips.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are 2 femoral head disorders that commonly affect Children and adolescents: Avascular necrosis of the femoral head and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE).
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a novel C propeptide mutation in COL2A1.
Femoral neck fracture (FNF) is likely to develop into conditions that require hip joint replacement even after appropriate treatment due to complications, such as avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) and nonunion.
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head develops as a result of obstruction of blood vessels of the hip bone.
Coronal-plane imaging is favored for evaluating avascular necrosis of the femoral head because it allows the best assessment of the weight-bearing surface.
sup][2],[3],[5],[6] What is important is that subcapital femoral neck fracture in young adults is often associated with higher incidences of nonunion and avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH), which will result in a devastating outcome.
Two patients had total hip replacement for avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
Several authors have considered replacement of the femoral head as an alternative due to the frequent development of nonunion, failure of osteosynthesis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
The patients included in the study were those who had unilateral DDH, received complete radiological follow-up until they were at least 10 years old, did not have any type of avascular necrosis of the femoral head during the follow-up period, and had both an intact Shenton's line and a center-edge angle of Wiberg (5) greater than 15[degrees]at the latest follow-up.
Predictive method for subsequent avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) by observation of bleeding from the cannulated screw used for fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures.
Mann RJ: Avascular necrosis of the femoral head following intertrochanteric fractures.