avascular

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avascular

 [a-vas´ku-ler]
not vascular; bloodless.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ă-vas'kyū-lăr, ā-vas'kyū-lăr),
Without blood or lymphatic vessels; may be a normal state, as in certain forms of cartilage, or the result of disease.
Synonym(s): nonvascular

avascular

/avas·cu·lar/ (a-vas´ku-ler) not vascular; bloodless.

avascular

(ā-văs′kyə-lər)
adj.
Not associated with or supplied by blood vessels.

a·vas′cu·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

avascular

[āvas′kyələr]
Etymology: Gk, a, without; L, vasculum, vessel
1 pertaining to a tissue area that is not receiving a sufficient supply of blood. The reduced supply may be the result of blockage by a blood clot or of the deliberate stoppage of flow during surgery or during control of a hemorrhage.
2 pertaining to a kind of tissue that does not have blood vessels.

avascular

adjective Without blood vessels; lacking an adequate blood supply.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ā-vas'kyū-lăr)
Without blood or lymphatic vessels.

avascular

Lacking blood vessels.

avascular

without a blood supply. avascular necrosis death of tissue due to lack of blood supply, usually referring to bone, following injury. Other causes in bone include hyperbaric exposure (diving), excessive intake of corticosteroids or alcohol, and some diseases. Commonly occurs after fracture of the femoral neck, leading to death of the femoral head. Also seen in fractures of the scaphoid bone in the wrist or of the head of the humerus. Often leads to osteoarthritis.

avascular

non-vascular, e.g. a tissue area deprived of its blood supply

avascular

not vascular; bloodless.

avascular necrosis of the femoral head
avascular chorion
the normally avascular and villous tips of the chorioallantoic membranes in pig, sheep and cattle placentas; colored white to brown, wrinkled; called also the necrotic tips.
References in periodicals archive ?
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head develops as a result of obstruction of blood vessels of the hip bone.
We can say that if a dysplastic hip is anatomically reduced when the patient is less than 18 months of age, and this anatomic reduction is maintained without the occurrence of any type of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, a considerable improvement in AA (nearly 6[degrees] to 7[degrees]) can be expected by 1 year postoperatively, and a slow but continuous improvement in acetabular development can occur during childhood.