avascular


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avascular

 [a-vas´ku-ler]
not vascular; bloodless.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ă-vas'kyū-lăr, ā-vas'kyū-lăr),
Without blood or lymphatic vessels; may be a normal state, as in certain forms of cartilage, or the result of disease.
Synonym(s): nonvascular

avascular

/avas·cu·lar/ (a-vas´ku-ler) not vascular; bloodless.

avascular

(ā-văs′kyə-lər)
adj.
Not associated with or supplied by blood vessels.

a·vas′cu·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

avascular

[āvas′kyələr]
Etymology: Gk, a, without; L, vasculum, vessel
1 pertaining to a tissue area that is not receiving a sufficient supply of blood. The reduced supply may be the result of blockage by a blood clot or of the deliberate stoppage of flow during surgery or during control of a hemorrhage.
2 pertaining to a kind of tissue that does not have blood vessels.

avascular

adjective Without blood vessels; lacking an adequate blood supply.

a·vas·cu·lar

(ā-vas'kyū-lăr)
Without blood or lymphatic vessels.

avascular

Lacking blood vessels.

avascular

without a blood supply. avascular necrosis death of tissue due to lack of blood supply, usually referring to bone, following injury. Other causes in bone include hyperbaric exposure (diving), excessive intake of corticosteroids or alcohol, and some diseases. Commonly occurs after fracture of the femoral neck, leading to death of the femoral head. Also seen in fractures of the scaphoid bone in the wrist or of the head of the humerus. Often leads to osteoarthritis.

avascular

non-vascular, e.g. a tissue area deprived of its blood supply

avascular

not vascular; bloodless.

avascular necrosis of the femoral head
avascular chorion
the normally avascular and villous tips of the chorioallantoic membranes in pig, sheep and cattle placentas; colored white to brown, wrinkled; called also the necrotic tips.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip - Prognostic factors influencing the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
Avascular necrosis of the capital femoral epiphysis as a complication of closed reduction of congenital dislocation of hip.
They have also reported avascular necrosis of head of femur (AVNFH) with considerable shortening of femoral neck in 06 of their 19 patients resulting in considerable morbidity.
Although at almost 5 years from surgery this patient has subsequently developed avascular necrosis we did achieve stable fixation and fracture healing by the method described.
Additionally, improved understanding regarding the factors and risks for humeral head avascular necrosis lead to further understanding and improved fracture management.
CT scan and MRI showed radiologic changes consistent with bilateral avascular necrosis of femoral heads i.
The initial criteria for classification and grading of FVM/FTV concluded that poor clinical outcome was correlated with the severe cases, harboring extensive avascular villi or at least 2 foci consisting of more than 15 distal contiguous villous vascular karyorrhectic/avascular villi.
As reported previously, capillaries which crossed the horizontal meridian and an absence of capillary avascular zone were noted on FA imaging.
These deformities may be directly due to the surgical technique applied or may be due to avascular necrosis (AVN) that developed in the femoral head after conservative and surgical treatment (1-3).
Agarwala and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of bisphosphonates in the treatment of avascular necrosis of the hip: 100 hip cohort was given 70 mg orally per week of alendronate and 500 to 1,000 mg calcium and 400 to 800 IU vitamin D3 and followed every 3 months for up to 1 year, then every 6 months thereafter.
The basis for the AO/ASIF classification is predicated on disruption of the blood supply to the articular segment, increasing incidence of avascular necrosis.