avalanche

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Nuclear medicine Avalanche ionization
Wilderness medicine A natural disaster in which massive unsorted mixtures of snow/ice/rock/mud cascade down a steep incline. Powder snow avalanches can exceed speeds of 300 km/h, and masses of 10,000,000 tonnes
Statistics Europe, 150 deaths/year; USA/Canada, 15/year; most are recreational—e.g., snowmobilers, mountaineers, back-country skiers
Avalanche risks Decreased snow stability; slope angles > 35º
Emergency action Do not wait; even in well-equipped ski areas, helicopters take 45 minute to arrive
Survival 15 minutes—85%; 30 minutes—40%; 1 hour—20%; 2 hours—0%
Cause of death Crush injury, hypothermia, suffocation

avalanche

Geomedicine A natural disaster in which a massive block of snow cascades down a steep incline Statistics In North America, ± 15 die thereof/yr; in Europe, 150/yr; most are recreational deaths–eg, snowmobilers, mountaineers, backcountry skiers Avalanche risks ↓ Snow stability; slope angles > 35º COD Crush injury, asphyxia. See Geological disaster.
References in periodicals archive ?
Climbers could hear the sounds of avalanches tumbling down the steeper slopes.
Parks Canada has developed a new set of Avalanche Terrain Ratings, to be used with the daily Avalanche Bulletins, to assist people in assessing the risks and making planning judgments regarding back country trips.
Most avalanches tend to happen during or right after storms, new snowfall, or wind," says Birkeland.
The center tells explorers that they can avoid avalanches by recognizing and avoiding avalanche terrain and by carrying and knowing how to use avalanche rescue gear.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-2 January 2002-Swedes suspected of causing avalanche in Switzerland (C)1994-2002 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
In Italy, two back-to-back avalanches in the northern Venosta Valley trapped a group of seven Germans and one Italian skiing on an unauthorised route, said alpine rescue official Luigi Weger.
Hundreds of thousands of avalanches slide down mountains in North America each year.
Some regions are prone to avalanches because of their particular geological or geographical conditions.
If the logarithm of the number of avalanches in a SOC sandpile is plotted against the logarithm of the size of the avalanches, the result is a straight line.
The area was reported to have been hit with several avalanches in the past.
She recalls the harrowing accounts of a skier buried so tightly that he could move only an index finger and of the death of a close friend who, despite his familiarity with the dangers of avalanches, succumbed to one.