autosome


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Related to autosome: hemophilia, autosomal inheritance

autosome

 [aw´to-sōm]
any of the 22 pairs of chromosomes in humans other than the pair concerned with determination of sex.

au·to·some

(aw'tō-sōm),
Any chromosome other than a sex chromosome; autosomes normally occur in pairs in somatic cells and singly in gametes.
Synonym(s): euchromosome
[auto- + G. sōma, body]

autosome

/au·to·some/ (-sōm) any non–sex-determining chromosome; in humans there are 22 pairs of autosomes.autoso´mal

autosome

(ô′tə-sōm′)
n.
A chromosome that is not a sex chromosome.

au′to·so′mal (-sō′məl) adj.
au′to·so′mal·ly adv.

autosome

[ô′təsōm]
any chromosome that is not a sex chromosome and that appears as a homologous pair in a somatic cell. Humans have 22 pairs of autosomes, which transmit all genetic traits and conditions other than those that are sex-linked. Also called euchromosome [yoo′krōməsōm] . Compare sex chromosome. autosomal, adj.

autosome

A non-sex (non-X, non-Y) chromosome which in normal humans is one of 22 pairs of chromosomes.

autosome

Cytogenetics Any chromosome in an organism's complement–22 pairs in humans–other than sex chromosomes, X and Y See Chromosome, Diploid, Genome. Cf Sex chromosome.

au·to·some

(aw'tō-sōm)
Any chromosome other than a sex chromosome; autosomes normally occur in pairs in somatic cells and singly in gametes.
[auto- + G. sōma, body]

autosome

Any one of the ordinary paired CHROMOSOMES other than the sex chromosomes.

autosome

a type of chromosome found in all cells not concerned with SEX DETERMINATION. Chromosomes are of two types: autosomes and SEX CHROMOSOMES. Autosomes carry the major part of genetic information in cells, including information on sexual characteristics. See SEX LINKAGE for a comparison of the inheritance of autosomal and sex-linked genes.

Autosome

A chromosome not involved in sex determination.
Mentioned in: Peroxisomal Disorders

autosome

any chromosome other than the sex chromosomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
To summarize, most of the patients previously described had translocations between the X chromosome and autosomes 4, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18.
The complement recorded in populations of the Bitlis race includes a single large bi-armed marker autosome, whereas that of populations of the Yozgat and Tuncelicus race has two distinctly large bi-armed pairs (Yuksel & Gulkac 1995, Coskun 2004a).
Our study is in agreement with the hypothesis supported by a review of balanced X autosome translocations where 23 of 36 phenotypic females had POF (premature ovarian failure) with a break point between Xq13 and Xq26.
However, human mtDNA and Y chromosomes have only about one-tenth of the diversity expected from the equivalent chimp values and the autosomes.
In telophase I, ten autosomes move towards each pole after reductional division while the X chromosome lags behind, but finally reach one of the poles (Fig.
destructor from the USA populations was karyotyped (Stuart and Hatchett 1988) and the authors found that female somatic cells have two pairs of autosomes and two pairs of sex chromosomes (2n = 8), while male somatic cells have two pairs of autosomes and two monosomic sex chromosomes (2n - 2 = 6).
The Y chromosome resembles short, acrocentric autosomes (i.
The only variable autosome is pair 26 that is acrocentric in the European snow voles examined in this study, but metacentric in the other three species.
2,3,8] Miscellaneous chromosomal abnormalities have been demonstrated in some but not all affected individuals and are currently classified into 2 groups[3,9]: (1) various mosaicism for almost any autosome or sex chromosomes and (2) nonmosaic balanced X;autosome translocations with breakpoints in the juxtacentromeric region of the X Chromosome at Xp11 found so far in a limited group of girls with HI.
The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant, meaning the gene flaw is on an autosome (not the X or Y chromosome) and a person needs to inherit a flawed gene from only one parent to cause the disease.
gene heredity mutation mitosis embryo allele helix clone sequence polymer autosome phenotype recessive metaphase locus polymerase telophase oligonucleotide geneticist interphase prophase phage bacteriophage chromomere transduction transformation nucleus Mendelian genome meiosis chromosome recombinant pedigree plasmid vector replicon nucleosome chromatography zygote centromere anaphase genotype endonuclease backcross exonuclease polyploidy diakinesis cytogenetics crossover segregate codominance dominance translocation nucleolus