autophony


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Related to autophony: hyperacusis

autophony

 [aw-tof´ah-ne]
abnormal hearing of one's own voice and respiratory sounds, usually as a result of a patulous eustachian tube.

au·toph·o·ny

(aw-tof'ŏ-nē),
Increased hearing of one's own voice, breath sounds, arterial murmurs, and other noises of the upper body; noted especially in disease of the middle ear or of the nasal fossae.
[auto- + G. phōnē, sound]

autophony

/au·toph·o·ny/ (aw-tof´ah-ne) abnormal hearing of one's own voice and respiratory sounds, usually as a result of a patulous eustachian tube.

autophony

The hyperperception of one's own voice, breathing and other internal sounds, which may be due to occlusion of the external auditory canal—e.g., by earwax, serous otitis media, open eustachian tube and superior canal dehiscence syndrome.

au·toph·o·ny

(aw-tofŏ-nē)
Undue accentuation of the sound produced by one's own voice, usually caused by a middle-ear disorder; produces the "head-in-the-barrel" sensation.
[auto- + G. phōnē, sound]

au·toph·o·ny

(aw-tofŏ-nē)
Increased hearing of one's own voice, breath sounds, arterial murmurs, and other noises of the upper body; noted especially in disease of the middle ear or of the nasal fossae.
[auto- + G. phōnē, sound]
References in periodicals archive ?
At the 1-week evaluation, he said his dizziness, autophony, and hyperacusis had completely resolved, he had experienced no recurrent vertigo, and his left-sided aural fullness had abated significantly.
The left-sided aural fullness, autophony, and tinnitus remained completely resolved, and his hearing had returned to preoperative levels.
Typical symptoms include sound- or pressure-induced vertigo, disequilibrium, oscillopsia, autophony, aural fullness, and hearing loss.
In 2005 he told the Department for Work and Pensions his wife suffered from hyperacusis and autophony, conditions which meant she was extremely sensitive to sound, and from depression.