automatism


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automatism

 [aw-tom´ah-tizm]
aimless and apparently undirected behavior that is not under conscious control and is performed without conscious knowledge; seen in psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, dissociative fugue, and other conditions.
command automatism the performance of suggested acts without exercise of critical judgment; seen in catatonic schizophrenia and in the hypnotic state.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm),
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotyped psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the affected person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to performan certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

/au·tom·a·tism/ (aw-tom´ah-tizm) performance of nonreflex acts without conscious volition.
command automatism  abnormal responsiveness to commands, as in hypnosis.

automatism

(ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
2. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

au·tom′a·tist n.

automatism

[ôtom′ətiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, automatismos, self-action
1 (in physiology) involuntary function of an organ system independent of apparent external stimuli, such as the beating of the heart, or dependent on external stimuli but not consciously controlled, such as the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
2 (in philosophy) the theory that the body acts as a machine and that the mind, whose processes depend solely on brain activity, is a noncontrolling adjunct of the body.
3 (in psychology) mechanical, repetitive, and undirected behavior that is not consciously controlled, as seen in psychomotor epilepsy, hysterical states, and such acts as sleepwalking. Kinds of automatism include ambulatory automatism, command automatism, and immediate posttraumatic automatism. Also called automatic behavior.

automatism

Neurology
A form of motor aphasia characterised by stereotyped utterances repeated multiple times, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform an act. Automatisms are associated with organic brain disease in the temporal neocortex. 

Associations
Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc.

Psychiatry
Automatic and apparently undirected non-purposeful behaviour that is not consciously controlled.

automatism

Monophasia, recurring utterances, verbal stereotypy Neurology A form of motor aphasia, characterized by stereotyped utterances repeatedly repeated, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform a motor act Associations Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc. See Aphasia, Motor aphasia Psychiatry Automatic and apparently undirected nonpurposeful behavior that is not consciously controlled. See Automatic behavior.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotypic psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to the performance of certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

The quality of acting in a mechanical or involuntary manner. A feature of some forms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. State of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to perform certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism (ôtom´ətiz´əm),

n a tendency to take extra or superfluous doses of a drug when under its influence.

automatism

mechanical, often repetitive motor behavior performed without conscious control.

Patient discussion about automatism

Q. My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so? My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so?

A. No necessarily. Your body will be in shock for a bit from the switch over. I think eating natural and unprocessed foods cause the major decline in weight since its all natural.

More discussions about automatism
References in periodicals archive ?
Simon Verdun-Jones's seminal work on insanity, automatism, and fitness to stand trial in Canada goes unmentioned, (10) as does other international work on the relation between automatism and insanity.
Rodowick argues that the automatisms of cinema--habitual modes of production, common in film to the point of an unthinking redundancy--remain in television and new media, heavily influencing how these newer media shape our perception of reality.
When he ensouls an inanimate object as his adoring counterpart, he manifests precisely the unconscious automatism that has all along determined his comportment toward the world, his foundational investment in a narcissistic fantasy of perfection and ultimacy.
In Freedland's pieces, ontological dualism is overcome by a measure of automatism, physicalist reductivism by an appeal to autonomy.
Gasarian shows how all of Breton's philosophy about surrealist living and writing, including his corroboration of automatism and his political commitments, may be read and understood through Breton's poetics of doubleness, of reconciliation and synthesis, of the necessary co-existence of poetry and life.
B The Case of Vasily Karageorges V Options for the Reform of Automatism
The priority themes on which it will be working include aeronautical sciences with acoustics, aerodynamics and propulsion, along with sciences and space, focusing on research in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), navigation, automatism and piloting.
I remember how Robert Motherwell didn't like the term abstract expressionism and preferred abstract automatism.
According to modernist poet Andre Breton, Surrealism works as a "purely psychic automatism through which we undertake to express, in words, writing, or any other activity, the actual functioning of thought, thought dictated apart from any control by reason and any aesthetic or moral consideration.
It is important to note that there is no criminal law defence based on anger, although the existence of anger during the commission of the offence may be a consideration in some defences, such as automatism or provocation.
Pure psychic automatism by which it is intended to express, either verbally or in writing, the true function of thought.