suture

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suture

 [soo´chur]
1. sutura.
2. a stitch or series of stitches made to secure apposition of the edges of a surgical or traumatic wound; used also as a verb to indicate application of such stitches.
3. material used in closing a wound with stitches. adj., adj su´tural.
Various types of sutures. From Dorland's, 2000.
absorbable suture a strand of material that is used for closing wounds and becomes dissolved in the body fluids and disappears; types include surgical gut, tendon, and some synthetics.
apposition suture a superficial suture used for exact approximation of the cutaneous edges of a wound.
approximation suture a deep suture for securing apposition of the deep tissue of a wound.
buried suture one placed within the tissues and concealed by the skin.
catgut suture an absorbable suture made from surgical gut.
cobbler's suture double-armed suture.
collagen suture a suture made from the tendons of cattle, chemically treated, purified, and processed into strands; it is most often used in ophthalmologic surgery.
continuous suture one in which a continuous, uninterrupted length of material is used.
coronal suture the line of union between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
cranial suture the lines of junction between the bones of the skull.
Czerny's suture
1. an intestinal suture in which the thread is passed through the mucous membrane only.
2. union of a ruptured tendon by splitting one of the ends and suturing the other end into the slit.
Czerny-Lembert suture a combination of the Czerny and the Lembert sutures.
double-armed suture one made with suture material threaded through a needle at each end. Called also cobbler's suture.
false suture a line of junction between apposed surfaces without fibrous union of the bones.
Gély's suture a continuous stitch for wounds of the intestine, made with a thread having a needle at each end.
interrupted suture one in which each stitch is made with a separate piece of material.
lambdoid suture the line of union between the upper borders of the occipital and parietal bones, shaped like the Greek letter lambda.
Lembert suture an inverting suture used in gastrointestinal surgery.
lock-stitch suture a continuous hemostatic suture used in intestinal surgery, in which the needle is, after each stitch, passed through the loop of the preceding stitch.
mattress suture suturing with the stitches parallel to the wound edges (horizontal mattress suture) or at right angles to them (vertical mattress suture).
purse-string suture a type of suture commonly used to bury the stump of the appendix, a continuous running suture being placed about the opening, and then drawn tight.
relaxation suture any suture so formed that it may be loosened to relieve tension as necessary.
retention suture a reinforcing suture made of exceptionally strong material such as wire, and including large amounts of tissue in each stitch. Used to relieve pressure on the primary suture line and to decrease the potential for wound dehiscence.
sagittal suture the line of union of the two parietal bones, dividing the skull anteroposteriorly into two symmetrical halves.
squamous suture the suture between the pars squamosa of the temporal bone and parietal bone.
subcuticular suture a method of skin closure involving placement of stitches in the subcuticular tissues parallel with the line of the wound.
synthetic absorbable suture an absorbable suture produced from strands of polymers; the most commonly used materials are polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) and polyglycolic acid (Dexon); the latter is more rapidly absorbed. Synthetic absorbable sutures are absorbed by slow hydrolysis, a chemical process in which the polymer reacts with tissue fluids, causing a breakdown of the molecular structure of the material at a predictable rate and with minimal tissue reaction.
vertical mattress suture a suture whose stitches are at right angles to the edges of the wound, taking both deep and superficial bites of tissue; the superficial ones achieve more exact apposition of the cutaneous margins. When the suture material is pulled tight, the wound edges evert.

su·ture

(sū'chūr), This word refers to a seam consisting of several stitches. It is not properly synonymous with stitch.
1. A form of fibrous joint in which two bones formed in membrane are united by a fibrous membrane continuous with the periosteum. Synonym(s): sutura [TA], suture joint
2. To unite two surfaces by sewing. Synonym(s): stitch (3)
3. The material (silk thread, wire, synthetic material, etc.) with which two surfaces are kept in apposition.
4. The seam so formed, a surgical suture.
[L. sutura, a seam]

suture

/su·ture/ (soo´cher)
1. sutura.
2. a stitch or series of stitches made to secure apposition of the edges of a surgical or traumatic wound.
3. to apply such stitches.
4. material used in closing a wound with stitches.su´tural

absorbable suture  a strand of material used for closing wounds which is subsequently dissolved by the tissue fluids.
apposition suture  a superficial suture used for exact approximation of the cutaneous edges of a wound.
approximation suture  a deep suture for securing apposition of the deep tissue of a wound.
buried suture  one placed deep in the tissues and concealed by the skin.
catgut suture  see surgical gut, under gut.
coaptation suture  apposition s.
cobblers' suture  one made with suture material threaded through a needle at each end.
continuous suture  one in which a continuous, uninterrupted length of material is used.
coronal suture  the line of junction of the frontal bone with the two parietal bones.
cranial sutures  the lines of junction between the bones of the skull.
Czerny's suture 
1. an intestinal suture in which the thread is passed through the mucous membrane only.
2. union of a ruptured tendon by splitting one of the ends and suturing the other end into the slit.
false suture  a line of junction between apposed surfaces without fibrous union of the bones.
figure-of-eight suture  one in which the threads follow the contours of the figure 8.
Gély's suture  a continuous stitch for wounds of the intestine, made with a thread having a needle at each end.
glover's suture  lock-stitch s.
Halsted suture  a modification of the Lembert suture.
interrupted suture  one in which each stitch is made with a separate piece of material.
Lembert suture  an inverting suture used in gastrointestinal surgery.
lock-stitch suture  a continuous hemostatic suture used in intestinal surgery, in which the needle is, after each stitch, passed through the loop of the preceding stitch.
loop suture  interrupted s.
mattress suture  a method in which the stitches are parallel with (horizontal mattress s.) or at right angles to (vertical mattress s.) the wound edges.
nonabsorbable suture  suture material which is not absorbed in the body.
purse-string suture  a continuous, circular inverting suture, such as is used to bury the stump of the appendix.
relaxation suture  any suture so formed that it may be loosened to relieve tension as necessary.
subcuticular suture  a method of skin closure involving placement of stitches in the subcuticular tissues parallel with the line of the wound.
uninterrupted suture  continuous s.

suture

(so͞o′chər)
n.
1.
a. The process of joining two surfaces or edges together along a line by sewing.
b. The material, such as thread, gut, or wire, that is used in this procedure.
c. The line or stitch so formed.
2. Medicine
a. The fine thread or other material used surgically to close a wound or join tissues.
b. The stitch so formed.
3. Anatomy The line of junction or an immovable joint between two bones, especially of the skull.
4. Biology A seamlike joint or line of articulation, such as the line of dehiscence in a dry fruit or the spiral seam marking the junction of whorls of a gastropod shell.
tr.v. su·tured, su·turing, su·tures
To join by means of sutures or a suture.

su′tur·al adj.
su′tur·al·ly adv.

suture

[so̅o̅′chər]
Etymology: L, sutura
1 n, a border or a joint, such as between the bones of the cranium.
2 v, to stitch together cut or torn edges of tissue with suture material.
3 n, a surgical stitch taken to repair an incision, tear, or wound.
4 n, material used for surgical stitches, such as absorbable or nonabsorbable silk, catgut, wire, or synthetic material.
enlarge picture
Types of sutures

suture

noun Surgery A material–eg, wire, thread–used to hold tissues in apposition. See Biosyn suture, Knotless anchor suture, Linatrix suture, Safil® synthetic absorbable surgical suture, Synthetic absorbable suture, Synthetic nonabsorbable suture. Cf Stable verb To join tissues by sewing.

su·ture

(sū'chŭr) [TA]
1. A form of fibrous joint in which two bones formed in membrane are united by a fibrous membrane continuous with the periosteum.
Synonym(s): sutura [TA] .
2. To unite two surfaces by sewing.
Synonym(s): stitch (3) .
3. The material (silk thread, wire, catgut) with which two surfaces are kept in apposition.
4. The seam so formed; a surgical suture.
[L. sutura, a seam]

suture

1. A length of thread-like material used for surgical sewing or the product of surgical sewing. Sutures are made of many materials including catgut, collagen, linen, silk, nylon, polypropylene, polyester, human FASCIA LATA and stainless steel, and are available in a wide range of thicknesses. Many are provided with a suitable needle swaged on to one or both ends. See also SUTURING.
2. A fixed joint between bones of the vault of the skull.

suture

  1. (in surgery) a thread or wire used to join together a wound.
  2. (in surgery) the seam found after stitching two parts together.
  3. an immovable joint between the bones of the skull.
  4. (in plants) the line of fusion between two carpels.

suture

fibrous joint between skull bones

suture

to unite either side of a wound, by means of inserted sutures/stitches

su·ture

(sū'chŭr) [TA]
1. Fibrous joint in which two bones formed in membrane are united by a fibrous membrane continuous with periosteum.
2. To unite two surfaces by sewing.
Synonym(s): stitch (3) .
3. The material (e.g., silk thread, wire, synthetic material) with which two surfaces are kept in apposition.
[L. sutura, a seam]

suture (soo´chər),

n 1. a synarthrosis between two bones formed in a membrane, the uniting medium (which tends to disappear eventually) being a fibrous membrane continuous with the periosteum.
2. a surgical stitch or seam.
3. the material with which body structures are sewn, as after an operation or injury.
v 4. to sew up a wound.
suture, absorbable,
n a suture that becomes dissolved in body fluids and disappears (e.g., catgut).
suture, approximation,
n a suture made to bring about apposition of the deeper tissues of an incision or laceration.
suture, blanket,
n a suturing technique that loops each stitch over the previous one to create a succession of loops along one side and stitches across the incision. Also called
continuous lock stitch.
suture, button,
n a suture passed through buttonlike disks on the skin to prevent the suture cutting the soft tissue.
suture, chromic,
n a chromatized sheepgut suture.
suture, circumferential,
n a suture completely surrounding the tooth; generally used to suspend or retain a flap.
suture, continuous,
n a suture in which an uninterrupted length of suture material is used to close an incision or laceration.
suture, craniofacial,
n the line along which bones of the cranium or face articulate in an immovable articulation.
suture, frontomalar,
n most lateral point of the suture between the frontal and zygoma (zygomatic bones).
suture, interdental,
n a suture that joins two sides of the gingiva by passing between the teeth.
suture, interrupted,
n individual stitches, each tied separately.
suture knot,
n the tiny fastening used to hold a suture in place firmly but not too tightly. The specific type is dictated by procedure, incision location, and tension required to close the wound.
suture, mattress,
n a continuous suture that is applied back and forth through the tissues in the same vertical plane but at a different depth, or in the same horizontal plane but at the same depth.
suture (median palatine suture),
n the line of fusion of the two maxillae (two palatine processes), starting between the central incisors and extending posteriorly across the palate, separating the horizontal plates of the palatine bones into two nearly equal parts.
suture, monofilament,
n refers to the single-strand composition of the material used to secure surgical stitches.
suture, multifilament,
n refers to the multiple-strand composition of the material used to secure surgical stitches.
suture, natural,
n a type of organic material used to secure surgical stitches that may react adversely with body tissue.
suture needle, conventional cut,
n a suturing needle with three cutting edges, one on either side and a third located on the inside curve.
suture, nonabsorbable,
n a suture that does not dissolve in body fluids (e.g., silk, tantalum, nylon).
suture, purse-string,
n a horizontal mattress suture used generally about an implant cervix.
suture, shoelace,
n a continuous surgical suture for depression of the tongue and retention and holding of the lingual flap out of the field of operation during the surgical impression.
suture, suspension (sling),
n a type of surgical stitching used when the flap being repaired is open on the lingual or facial side; surrounds the tooth by passing between the surrounding teeth and gum tissue. The stitch is adjustable and allows for adjustment of the flap for proper healing.
Enlarge picture
Suspension suture.
suture, synthetic,
n new technology in surgical stitches developed to counteract the unreliable absorption rates and tissue sensitivity associated with natural stitches.
suture, transverse palatine
n the line along which the bones of the palate and the superior maxilla articulate in an immovable articulation. Also known as
sutura palatina transversa.

suture

1. the line of union of adjoining bones of the skull. See also sutura.
2. the linear union of fibers from the equator of the lens, meeting on the anterior and posterior surfaces. May be the location of metabolic cataracts.
3. a stitch or series of stitches made to secure apposition of the edges of a surgical or traumatic wound (see suture pattern below); used also as a verb to indicate application of such stitches.
4. material used in closing a wound with stitches.
Enlarge picture
Tendon sutures. By permission from Fossum TW, Small Animal Surgery, Mosby, 2001

absorbable suture (4)
a strand of organic or synthetic material used for closing wounds, which becomes dissolved in the body fluids and disappears, such as catgut and tendon or polydioxanone.
apposition suture (3)
a superficial suture used for exact approximation of the cutaneous edges of a wound.
approximation suture (3)
a deep suture for securing apposition of the deep tissue of a wound.
automatic ridge suture
braided suture (4)
thin filaments braided into a single suture; has the virtues of strength, flexibility, ease of handling and good knot security.
Bunnell suture (3)
buried suture (3)
one placed deep in the tissues and concealed by the skin.
Caslick suture (3)
see caslick operation.
catgut suture (4)
see catgut.
Chinese finger cuff suture (3)
a method of securing a thoracostomy tube to the thoracic wall in which the suture is placed deeply into the skin and underlying tissue and the ends are wrapped around the protruding tube in a spiral pattern ('Chinese finger cuff') and tied.
circular suture (3)
one applied around the circumference of a hollow viscus to close it, or to a portion of the wall to bring about inversion of the wall.
cobbler's suture (3)
one made with suture material threaded through a needle at each end.
Connell suture (3)
continuous suture (3)
one in which a continuous, uninterrupted length of material is used. Called also whip stitch.
continuous lock suture (3)
see lock-stitch suture pattern.
coronal suture (1)
the line of union between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
cotton suture (4)
a multifilament suture used mainly for closure of skin.
cranial suture (1)
the lines of junction between the bones of the skull.
cruciate suture (3)
see cruciate suture pattern.
Cushing suture (3)
Czerny suture (3)
Czerny-Lembert suture (3)
false suture (1)
a line of junction between apposed surfaces without a serrated union of the bones.
far-near-far suture (3)
far-near-near-far suture (3)
used on tendons, the first bite is made farthest from the severed end, across the gap and emerging close to the severed edge of the distal end. The second bite is close to the end of the proximal segment, crosses the gap and emerges farther from the end of the distal segment.
figure-eight suture (3)
a row of surgical pins are placed through both edges of the wound and suture material is wound back and forth around each pin, as with a shoelace.
four stitch interrupted suture (3)
furrier's suture (3)
simple continuous suture.
Gambee suture (3)
Gély's suture (3)
Goetze's suture (3)
Halsted suture (3)
see halsted suture pattern.
interrupted suture (3)
one in which each stitch is made with a separate piece of material.
intradermal suture (3)
one placed in the lower dermis; a buried suture. May be interrupted or continuous.
intracutaneous suture (3)
one totally within the substance of the skin, not emerging externally and not into the subcutaneous tissues. See also intradermal suture (above).
inverting suture (3)
one that turns the edges of the incision inward so the exposed surfaces, usually serosa, contact each other and the edges of the incision are buried. Used in closure of hollow viscera such as the stomach, uterus, intestine or visceral stumps. Includes the Connell, Cushing, Halsted, Lembert and Parker-Kerr suture patterns.
Kessler suture
see locking-loop suture (below).
lambdoid suture (1)
the line of union between the upper borders of the occipital and parietal bones, shaped like the Greek letter lambda; called also sutura lambdoides.
Lembert suture (3)
locking-loop suture
a tension suture used for apposition of severed tendon ends.
McLean suture (3)
mattress suture (3)
Mersilene suture (4)
an uncoated polyester suture material.
metal suture (4)
stainless steel is used universally. There are also special metal devices including Michel clips and skin staples and staples for intestinal repair.
near-far-far-near suture (3)
non-absorbable suture (4)
includes silk, steel, polyester, polymerized caprolactam, polypropylene, polyethylene, nylon and cotton.
nylon suture (4)
may be braided or monofilament.
Parker-Kerr suture (3)
suture pattern (3)
the placement of suture material, usually designed to achieve a particular purpose in relation to the tissue, organ or surgical procedure being performed, e.g. inversion or eversion of wound edges, relief of tension on the wound, or cosmetic results.
Enlarge picture
Types of suture patterns: (A) simple interrupted, (B) subcuticular, (C) simple continuous. By permission from Slatter D, Textbook of Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002
suture pin (4)
sharp-pointed pins that can be pushed through tissue, e.g. vulval lips, and secured at both ends by knobs so that they stay in situ.
pull-out suture (3)
purse-string suture (3)
a type of suture commonly used to bury the stump of the appendix, a continuous running suture being placed about the opening, and then drawn tight.
relaxation suture (3)
any suture so formed that it may be loosened to relieve tension as necessary.
retention suture (3)
used in the replacement of vaginal and uterine prolapse in cattle. Usually thick, heavy suture material, sometimes tape, is placed through adjacent tissues.
round-wound suture (3)
used for tension relief, it consists of surgical pins placed through both sides of the wound and suture material wound around the protruding ends and across the incision.
safety suture (3)
used in the surgical correction of patent ductus arteriosus, particularly in small dogs, to ensure that any slippage of ligatures or tissue will not result in excessive blood loss before being controlled by other means.
sagittal suture (1)
the line of union of the two parietal bones, dividing the skull anteroposteriorly into two symmetrical halves; called also sutura sagittalis.
silk suture (4)
braided silk is used as a nonabsorbable suture. It may be coated with wax or silicone to reduce its absorption of fluids. Its great advantages are its ease of handling and good knot-holding quality.
squamous suture (1)
a suture where the uniting bones overlap such as the suture between the pars squamosa of the temporal bone and parietal bone.
stainless steel suture (4)
see wire suture (below).
stent suture (3)
a tension suture for closing wounds created by placing a roll of bandage along the line of incision and tying the sutures over the top of it.
Enlarge picture
Stent suture pattern. By permission from Slatter D, Textbook of Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002
subcuticular suture (3), subcutaneous suture
a method of skin closure involving placement of stitches in the subcuticular tissues parallel with the line of the wound.
tension suture (3)
one placed to relieve tension on the incision; may be the same suture pattern that closes the incision or a separate suture or line of sutures of a different pattern.
three-loop pulley suture (3)
a complicated suture pattern used on tendons.
vest-over-pants suture (3)
walking suture (3)
a pattern of interrupted sutures used in closing large skin wounds. Each suture is placed first in the deep dermis and then into the deeper tissues, usually fascia, at a point closer to the center of the wound. The effect is to move the skin closer to the closing position with each suture, obliterate dead space, and relieve tension on the sutures eventually placed to close the wound edges.
wire suture (4)
stainless steel wire used as suture material as monofilament or braided. Problems are kinking, bulk knots, tearing of tissues and the need for special cutting instruments.
Zimmerman's aluminum wire suture (3)
a technique used for tension support. The stitches are placed with a cannula and ends are rolled instead of being tied.
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