automatism

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automatism

 [aw-tom´ah-tizm]
aimless and apparently undirected behavior that is not under conscious control and is performed without conscious knowledge; seen in psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, dissociative fugue, and other conditions.
command automatism the performance of suggested acts without exercise of critical judgment; seen in catatonic schizophrenia and in the hypnotic state.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm),
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotyped psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the affected person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to performan certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

/au·tom·a·tism/ (aw-tom´ah-tizm) performance of nonreflex acts without conscious volition.
command automatism  abnormal responsiveness to commands, as in hypnosis.

automatism

(ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
2. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

au·tom′a·tist n.

automatism

[ôtom′ətiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, automatismos, self-action
1 (in physiology) involuntary function of an organ system independent of apparent external stimuli, such as the beating of the heart, or dependent on external stimuli but not consciously controlled, such as the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
2 (in philosophy) the theory that the body acts as a machine and that the mind, whose processes depend solely on brain activity, is a noncontrolling adjunct of the body.
3 (in psychology) mechanical, repetitive, and undirected behavior that is not consciously controlled, as seen in psychomotor epilepsy, hysterical states, and such acts as sleepwalking. Kinds of automatism include ambulatory automatism, command automatism, and immediate posttraumatic automatism. Also called automatic behavior.

automatism

Neurology
A form of motor aphasia characterised by stereotyped utterances repeated multiple times, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform an act. Automatisms are associated with organic brain disease in the temporal neocortex. 

Associations
Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc.

Psychiatry
Automatic and apparently undirected non-purposeful behaviour that is not consciously controlled.

automatism

Monophasia, recurring utterances, verbal stereotypy Neurology A form of motor aphasia, characterized by stereotyped utterances repeatedly repeated, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform a motor act Associations Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc. See Aphasia, Motor aphasia Psychiatry Automatic and apparently undirected nonpurposeful behavior that is not consciously controlled. See Automatic behavior.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotypic psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to the performance of certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

The quality of acting in a mechanical or involuntary manner. A feature of some forms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. State of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to perform certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism (ôtom´ətiz´əm),

n a tendency to take extra or superfluous doses of a drug when under its influence.

automatism

mechanical, often repetitive motor behavior performed without conscious control.

Patient discussion about automatism

Q. My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so? My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so?

A. No necessarily. Your body will be in shock for a bit from the switch over. I think eating natural and unprocessed foods cause the major decline in weight since its all natural.

More discussions about automatism
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