autoinfection


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Related to autoinfection: hyperinfection, retroinfection

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn),
1. Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms that have already passed through an infective cycle.
2. Self-infection by direct contagion, as with pinworm (Enterobius vermicularis) eggs passed in the infectious state and transmitted by fingernails (anal-oral route).

autoinfection

(ô′tō-ĭn-fĕk′shən)
n.
Infection, such as recurrent boils, caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites that persist on or in the body.

autoinfection

1 an infection by disease organisms already present in the body but developing in a different body part.
2 a reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms.

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn)
1. Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms on or within the body that have already passed through an infective cycle, such as a succession of boils, or a new infective cycle with production of a new generation of larvae and adults.
2. Self-infection by direct contagion as with parasite eggs passed in the infectious state transmitted by fingernails (anal-oral route).
Synonym(s): autoreinfection.

autoinfection

Infection with bacteria or viruses surviving on or in the body, or transferred from one part of the body to another.

Autoinfection

An infection caused by a disease agent that is already present in the body.
Mentioned in: Threadworm Infection

autoinoculation

; autoinfection secondary infection originating from a distant focus of infection, e.g. infection of defective heart valves via bacteraemia due to infected ingrowing toenail

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn)
Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms that have already passed through an infective cycle.

autoinfection

spread of an infection from part of the body to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
In immunocompromised patients, however, the larvae change rapidly into infectious, filariform larvae and reinvade the gut, resulting in a cycle of autoinfection.
The parasite may then cause a longlived autoinfection in the host, leading to chronic infection that can last for several decades (3,4).
Eruptions may be particularly prominent in perianal sites where the external autoinfection cycle begins.
Filariform larvae can reenter the bloodstream of the host, by penetrating the colonic mucosa or perianal skin, and perpetuate the infectious cycle through this process of autoinfection (Fig.
7] The severity of the symptoms relates to the worm burden, along with evidence of autoinfection.
Transmission occurs in three ways: direct patient-to-patient contact, nosocomial spread, and autoinfection (Smith et al.
In the latter two strategies, definitive hosts were generally infected by eating infected second intermediate hosts, but some infections occurred by autoinfection (digestion of their own infected skin), as seen in Glypthelmins sp.
Simply petting the family dog or cat can facilitate autoinfection (hand-mouth) because parasites can be carried by fleas, mites and ticks.
Chances of autoinfection in children are also higher.
After the first life cycle, a process of autoinfection begins, which persists indefinitely in the host if the infection is not effectively treated.
Two types of oocysts are produced: the thick-walled type, which is commonly excreted from the host, and the thin-walled type, which is primarily involved in autoinfection.
Overwhelming parasitemia may occur in immunocompromised patients due to repeated autoinfection and may cause hyperinfective and invasive strongyloidiasis.