autoimmune response


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Related to autoimmune response: Autoimmune disorders

response

 [re-spons´]
any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.
acute phase response a group of physiologic processes occurring soon after the onset of infection, trauma, inflammatory processes, and some malignant conditions. The most prominent change is a dramatic increase of acute phase proteins in the serum, especially C-reactive protein. Also seen are fever, increased vascular permeability, and a variety of metabolic and pathologic changes.
anamnestic response the rapid reappearance of antibody in the blood following introduction of an antigen to which the subject had previously developed a primary immune response.
auditory brainstem response ABR; a special hearing test that tracks the nerve signals arising in the inner ear as they travel along the auditory nerve to the brain region responsible for hearing. A small speaker placed near the ear makes a clicking sound, and special electrodes record the nerve signal as it travels. The test can determine where along the nerve there is a lesion responsible for sensorineural hearing loss. It is often used for individuals with such loss in just one ear; this is often caused by a benign tumor along the auditory nerve, but if the ABR reading is normal in a given region, the chances of there being a tumor there are small. This test can also be used on infants since it requires no conscious response from the person being tested.
autoimmune response the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues. See also autoimmune disease.
conditioned response see conditioned response.
dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response a nursing diagnosis adopted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of a patient to adjust to lowered levels of mechanical ventilator support, which interrupts and prolongs the process of weaning. See also mechanical ventilatory weaning.
galvanic skin response the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response see immune response.
inflammatory response the various changes that tissue undergoes when it becomes inflamed; see inflammation.
post-trauma response former name for the nursing diagnosis post-trauma syndrome.
reticulocyte response increase in the formation of reticulocytes in response to a bone marrow stimulus.
triple response (of Lewis) a physiologic reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response an unlearned response, i.e., one that occurs naturally, in contrast to a conditioned response.

autoimmune response

autoimmune response

A generic and nonspecific term for any response of a host’s immune system to self-tissues, cells, or molecules.

autoimmune response

action of the immune system against some component of the body itself, resulting in one of the many autoimmune diseases (disorders).

response

any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.

autoimmune response
the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues.
conditioned response
see also conditioned response, conditioning.
dazzle response
shining a bright light in the eye causes a blink. Called also dazzle reflex.
galvanic skin response
the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response
specifically altered reactivity of the animal body after exposure to antigen, manifested as antibody-production, cell-mediated immunity, development of hypersensitivity, or as immunological tolerance. Called also immune reaction. See also immune response.
maze response
a test of vision for animals.
placing response
see placing reflex.
response rate
in surveys, the number of completed survey instruments (questionnaires, interview records) divided by the total number of persons approached.
response trial
a field trial conducted to test a hypothesis, often about the cause of a disease but can encompass therapeutics or control of a disease. The hypothesis is tested by observing the response to an alteration in the system, e.g. in feeding or in management.
triple response (of Lewis)
a physiological reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response
an unlearned response, i.e. one that occurs naturally. See also conditioning.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an autoimmune response, the antibody binds to a myelin protein; this causes the immune system to attack the myelin.
The significant serum autoimmune response, particularly with ANA, suggests that the autoimmunity probably has a contribution to the histopathological histological changes in the thyroid gland.
5) While enhancement of autoimmune responses may not be a sound strategy, this example illustrates how aberration in cell development may produce neoantigens that lead to unique immune responses.
Assessment of autoimmune responses associated with asbestos exposure in Libby, Montana, USA.
The more restricted the presentation, the less likely that molecule is to present self-peptides inducing an autoimmune response.
At least 15 diseases are known to be the direct result of an autoimmune response, while circumstantial evidence implicates >80 conditions with autoimmunity (2).
An immune response against them is initiated; hence, the term, autoimmune response.
The novelty here is the discovery of mirror image immunologic components as primary in triggering an autoimmune response.
The findings, which are published in the journal Paediatric Neurology, are the result of the pair's theory that as viruses are common trigger agents for autoimmune diseases, where the human body attacks itself, autism could involve a virusinduced autoimmune response, which in turn leads to autism.
In an effort to slow progression of the disease or treat an exacerbation, it is standard practice for physicians to administer steroid therapy to suppress the autoimmune response.
Chaitan Khosla and his colleagues at Stanford University and the University of Norway in Oslo report identifying a single component of gluten proteins that causes the autoimmune response characteristic of celiac sprue.
However, in situations of an imbalance between the supply and clearance of apoptotic bodies, the immune system can detect them, leading to an autoimmune response.

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