autogenic training

(redirected from autogenics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

autogenic training

 [aw″to-jen´ik]
a method of self-induced deep relaxation, derived from hypnosis.

autogenic training

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as assisting with self-suggestions about feelings of heaviness and warmth for the purpose of inducing relaxation. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

autogenic training

a form of psychotherapy that employs self-hypnosis and relaxation techniques. Also known as autogenics.

autogenic training,

n an outgrowth of self-hypnosis, a method of achieving a self-induced state of trance by passive concentration and aware-ness of body sensations to induce relaxation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Austrian research has also suggested that autogenics could help people with asthma.
Autogenic training evolved out of the research of brain physiologist Dr Oskar Vogt who in the 1880s found that some patients were able to put themselves in a self-hypnotic state which seemed to have positive effects on their recuperation.
His work provided the inspiration for Johannes Schultz, a Berlin psychiatrist and neurologist to investigate the therapeutic potential of auto-hypnosis exercises from which autogenic training emerged.
Researchers found significant improvements in the autogenic group compared with the control group, including a decrease in fear and anxiety, alleviation of asthma symptoms and asthma attacks and a reduction in the required quantities of controlled-dosage aerosol.
The autogenic group also tended to have a more positive approach to their diseases and greater confidence in coping with their symptoms.
Statistically significant changes occurred in respiratory rates and skin temperatures during the diaphragmatic breathing session; respiratory rates and peripheral skin temperatures during progressive muscle relaxation session; respiratory and pulse rates, and peripheral skin temperatures during the autogenic sessions.
Autogenic training session was most effective in showing a statistically significant change in decreased respiratory and pulse rates and increased peripheral skin temperature.
The purpose of this study was threefold: 1) to identify which semester of an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program is associated with the highest test anxiety; 2) using participants from that semester, to determine if an intervention including diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenic training assists students control their physiological responses; and 3) to determine if relaxation training decreases test anxiety.
RELAXATION INTERVENTION BART involved a series of relaxation training sessions where the students learned diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenic training.
During the fourth intervention session, the students were taught autogenic training techniques.