autochthonous

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autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

/au·toch·tho·nous/ (aw-tok´thah-nus)
1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

autochthonous

[ôtok′thənəs]
Etymology: Gk, autos, self, chthon, earth
relating to a disease or other condition that appears to have originated in the part of the body in which it was discovered.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.

autochthonous

1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, Geschiere and Nyamnjoh (2000: 424) argue that notions of autochthony "can be seen as marking a new form of ethnicity," one that because of its ahistoricity is less specific and therefore subject to greater political manipulation.
Myths and the Origins of Cities: Reflections on the Autochthony Theme in Euripides' Ion', in J.
In each of these instances, the various dance performances were grounded in rural imageries and scripts, conjuring--momentarily at least--a pristine and timeless autochthony despite their venues.
See Alonso's chapter entitled "The Exoticism of the Autochthonous" in his The Spanish American Regional Novel: Modernity and Autochthony, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990).
This capacity to become like the state depends both on widespread and powerful forms of Indigenous autochthony and also on the related embeddedness of local law in forms of cosmological charter and ancestral precedence.
For him, consolidating democracy in West Africa requires revisiting African socialism and communalism, most especially given its autochthony to Africa, the decentralization of power to allow popular participation in governance, mainstreaming gender issues into governance through women empowerment, civic/political education and the strengthening of political parties.
He suggests six propositions--the autochthony of democracy in Africa, alteration of the western heritage, decentering African politics by re-centering the people, moving the trend up, a diversity of routes and the demystification of the ballot box- that should mix to form the bedrock of an African--centered theory of democracy (pp.
Ethnologia slavica, in 1992 renamed Ethnologia slovaca et slavica, published a number of articles on Slovak autochthony and ethnic continuity which could be seen as veiled attacks on Magyar "expansionism" (Kucera 1991; Habovstiak 1992-93).
In this context, Kanak politics, the pleading for sovereignty as recognition of autochthony, the development of new alternative pathways to development, and the promotion of custom as a pillar of a new polity, (51) serve to build safeguards against hegemonic attempts at 'normalizing' life and conduct.
Here it is sufficient just to refer to the myth's image of the wild-fowl nest as a maternal-feminine womb but which, because it is in the forest, in the realm of the macro-cosmic world-body, has the significance of impersonal autochthony and auto-generativity.
Relations between indigenous Fijians, Indo-Fijians and Banabans are not the natural outcomes of autochthony or migration, of certainties flowing from precedence in dwelling.
White Skin and an Ati'ican Soul": Whiteness, Emplacement and Autochthony in Ngamiland, Swaziland.