autochthonous

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Related to autochthonic: two-fold, scrutinised

autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

/au·toch·tho·nous/ (aw-tok´thah-nus)
1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

autochthonous

[ôtok′thənəs]
Etymology: Gk, autos, self, chthon, earth
relating to a disease or other condition that appears to have originated in the part of the body in which it was discovered.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.

autochthonous

1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Japan's victory over Russia in 1905 made her a great power, and led to a search for autochthonic reasons to explain Japan's military achievements.
While there Tony had befriended Baraiye as a potentially influential elder of the only autochthonic Kamula sub-clan.
Faulkner also comically disparaged the critical tendency to appraise American writers in the context of Russian authors in Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles, preferring rather to see them as independent and autochthonic.