autochthonous

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autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

/au·toch·tho·nous/ (aw-tok´thah-nus)
1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

autochthonous

[ôtok′thənəs]
Etymology: Gk, autos, self, chthon, earth
relating to a disease or other condition that appears to have originated in the part of the body in which it was discovered.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.

autochthonous

1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traveling to remote resorts where the poverty of autochthons underscores tourists' self-indulgent affluence, his nomadic vacationers seek out landscapes of desolation that set off the oases of beauty and luxury where they couple in groups of three or four.
As a result of these three waves of immigration, the population has been divided into two groups: autochthons or populations previously settled (a group comprising those settled before the 15th century) and people coming from elsewhere (a group composed of populations settled from the 15th century onwards).
People could, for example, enlist the support of autochthons on their own.