autoantibody


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autoantibody

 [aw″to-an´tĭ-bod″e]
an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of the individual's own tissues.

au·to·an·ti·bod·y

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē),
An antibody that occurs in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue (or "self antigen") and reacts with the inciting target tissue.

autoantibody

/au·to·an·ti·body/ (-an´tĭ-bod″e) an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of one's own tissues.

autoantibody

(ô′tō-ăn′tĭ-bŏd′ē)
n.
An antibody that reacts with the cells, tissues, or native proteins of the individual in which it is produced.

autoantibody

[ô′tō·an′tibod′ē]
Etymology: Gk, autos + anti, against; AS, bodig, body
an immunoglobulin produced by a person that recognizes an antigen on that person's own tissues. Several mechanisms may trigger the production of autoantibodies: an antigen, formed during fetal development and then sequestered, may be released as a result of infection, chemical exposure, or trauma, as occurs in autoimmune thyroiditis, sympathetic uveitis, and aspermia; there may be disorders of immune regulatory or surveillance function; antibodies produced against certain streptococcal antigens during infection may cross-react with myocardial tissue, causing rheumatic heart disease, or with glomerular basement membrane, causing glomerulonephritis; and normal body proteins may be converted to autoantigens by chemicals, infectious organisms, or therapeutic drugs. Some examples of autoantibodies are those found against gastric parietal cells in pernicious anemia, against platelets in autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and against antigens on the surface of erythrocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. There is growing evidence that genetic factors increase the incidence and severity of autoimmune diseases.

autoantibody

Any antibody produced by an organism against one of its own—self-antigens.

Autoantibodies
Examples of autoantibodies and disease associations
• Anti-actin antibodies—coeliac disease.
• Anti-centromere antibodies—CREST syndrome.
• Anti-ganglioside antibodies—acute motor neuronal neuropathy.
• Antimitochondrial antibody—primary biliary cirrhosis.
• Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody—Wegener’s granulomatosis (in neutrophil cytoplasm).
• Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody—Churg-Strauss syndrome, microscopic polyangiitis, systemic vasculitides (perinuclear location).
• Anti-nuclear antibodies (e.g., anti-SSA/Ro)—systemic lupus erythematosus.
• Anti-signal recognition peptide—polymyositis.
• Anti-smooth muscle antibody—chronic autoimmune hepatitis.
• Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies.
• Anti-parietal cell antibodies, and others.
• Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA).
• Anti-smooth muscle actin (SMA).
• Anti-liver-kidney-microsomal antibody (LKM), 2 types:
   - Anti-mitochondrial (AMA);
   - Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic (pANCA).
• Anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA), other autoantibodies.
• ANA and SMAs are known to be positive in AIH, PBC, PSC, HCV, HBV, HDV, NASH, drug-induced hepatitis.

autoantibody

Immunology Any antibody produced by an organism against one of its own–self antigens. See Antibody, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Lupus erythematosus, Myasthenia gravis, Rheumatoid arthritis.

au·to·an·ti·body

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē)
Antibody occurring in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue, and which reacts with the inciting tissue component.

autoantibody

An antibody derived from the immune system, which then acts against body tissues or constituents.

Autoantibody

An antibody produced by the body in reaction to any of its own cells or cell products.

au·to·an·ti·body

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē)
Antibody occurring in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue, and which reacts with the inciting tissue component.

autoantibody,

n an immunoglobulin produced by the immune system that is directed against one or more of the host's own proteins. Many autoimmune diseases in humans, most notably lupus erythematosus, are caused by such antibodies.

autoantibody

an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of the animal's own cells or tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: A significant correlation was observed between the development of DRP and serum CA-II autoantibody levels in type 1 diabetic cases.
The investigators reported finding a similar distribution of NVC abnormalities across the major SSc autoantibody subtypes (except for anti-RNP-positive patients), suggesting that combinations of the two variables would be most predictive of cardiopulmonary involvement.
Subsequently, the same research group discovered that cTnI is the major target antigen for the autoantibody in these mice (3).
Tofurther evaluate the clinical significance of anti-SmD1[sub]83-119 autoantibody in laboratory diagnosis of cSLE, we performed additional analyses in children with non-SLE diseases.
Insulin autoantibody could help to screen latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in phenotypic type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese.
Plasma or serum from patients with a cold RBC autoantibody may have specificity for a carbohydrate antigen, such as i or I, and can react more or less strongly with group O panel cells that contain or lack such antigens.
Long-term outcome of interferon-a induced thyroid autoimmunity and prognostic influence of thyroid autoantibody pattern at the end of treatment.
Their autoantibody levels decreased but in most cases did not normalize, which suggested problems in compliance with the demanding diet.
Lupus anticoagulant (LA) is an autoantibody that causes elevation in phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests (1-3).
The discovery of a specific autoantibody response in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients, which selectively targets astrocytic end feet at the glia limitans (1) and which is directed against the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) (2) was a milestone in defining this disease entity and profoundly changed our view regarding its pathogenesis.
Topics include high-throughput gel-based techniques, including those used to examine the entire proteome within discrete pl fractions and complementary techniques for the specific analysis of glycoproteins, mass spectrometry techniques to use in identifying proteins, automated laser capture dissection (as it is used with other techniques), production and use of microarrays for the purpose of profiling protein expression patterns in tissue samples, arrays using tissue-derived antigens, reverse-array platforms, commercially-designed arrays, and measurement of autoantibody expression in tissues, including new methods for detecting autoantibody expression.