authorship


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Related to authorship: Guest Authorship

authorship

The state of being an author; the writer of a communication.

Authorship in the sciences
The credits for a publication in the sciences are problematic; the advantages of being an author on published reports in the literature are considerable, and include peer respect, conferral of authority status and career advancement, which is often a function of how many publications a person has generated. Sharing authorship credits has the potential disadvantage of being the co-author on a report later deemed fraudulent.

Dr A Relman, emeritus editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, delineated four criteria (see table), at least 2 of which must be met to legitimately share authorship credits. Many articles, proceedings or books have multiple authors; the names of the authors following the first author are known as co-authors; corporations, government agencies and associations may also be listed as authors of a work. In ISI indexes, first (primary) and secondary (co-authors) of a source article are searchable in print and electronically—ISI also indexes all cited authors; the first cited author in each reference is searchable in all products; unique to the Web of Science is the ability to search on secondary authors in the cited reference field.

Authorship “Relman’s criteria”
• Conception of idea and design of experiment;
• Actual execution of experiment—hands-on experience;
• Analysis and interpretation of data;
• Writing the manuscript.

authorship

Science journalism The state of being an author. See Author, Author misconduct, CV-weighing, Darsee affair, Honorary authorship, Mega-author paper, Slutsky affair, Spurious authorship, Unearned authorship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals: Ethical considerations in the conduct and reporting of research: Authorship and contributorship.
The idea of authorship as a collective activity was not intended to deny the agency of individuals, but rather to credit the individuals and institutions that helped to create and shape that idea.
Shakespeare's Literary Authorship is a dense, erudite book by one of the field's most highly regarded scholars of the Renaissance literary career.
The WAME policy statements (3) also state, "Performing technical services, translating text, identifying patients for study, supplying materials, and providing funding or administrative oversight over facilities where the work was done are not, in themselves, sufficient for authorship.
Both institution and authorship ranking showed marginally significant associations with author gender (P = 0.
Other forms of misconduct include ' ghost authorship', which is non-inclusion of individuals as authors who played an effective part in the work and were qualified for authorship, and ' duplication' or publication of the same paper in different journals with little or no change in it.
Discussing authorship in Lynch's early career can be thorny, but Todd traces Lynch's trajectory as he moved rapidly from underground (Fraserhead) to Victorian period drama (The Elephant Man) to event picture (Dune) to auteur picture (Blue Velvet) to TV soap opera (Twin Peaks).
Google is using Authorship as a signal of ownership and origin, an ideal way for it to force quality and aiding it in the delivery of returning the most appropriate results to the searcher.
Without doubt attention to publication ethics, such as ensuring manuscripts are free from error, plagiarism, and fabrication, is crucial so that those accessing published literature can have trust in the authorship and veracity of the articles.
For Widiss, this idea of authorship is present in works throughout twentieth-century American writing, so that the author is no less a deliberate construction in the early half of the twentieth century and no less an elusive figure at the century's end.
Ethical questions regarding joint authorship: Business and non-business faculty perceptions on noncontributing authorship.
Participants reported rejecting information from health Web sites because sites are too commercial (reported by 47 percent of participants) or because the source or authorship could not be determined (reported by 37 percent of participants).