author

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author

The writer of an article, chapter, or other complete written work.
Many articles, proceedings, or books have multiple authors; the names of the authors following the first author are known as co-authors. Corporations, government agencies, and associations may also be listed as authors of a work.

author

Journalism A person involved in writing a manuscript

au·thor

(aw'thŏr)
medical transcription Person who orally creates a report to be transcribed.
Synonym(s): dictator, originator.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have profited greatly from entering Rabinowitz and Bancroft's authorial audience, and I hope my suggested stage two revisions contribute to their project.
Prevailing Conceptions of Transformativeness and Authorial Presence
The majority of her book is written in the first person plural: 'So far, in our exploration of the Frame function we've encountered shades of an authorial bias' (p.
Even at the height of what Ascoli understands as Dante's renouncing of all claim to authority and authorial status, Dante the nuncius is always followed, in Ascoli's reading, by his earthly shadow, his Ulyssean double.
Whatever the resulting sociology of art, the worldwide marketplace and the Internet together with Authorial Disbelief should fuel engines of creation that are far more powerful than anything before.
He explores the political culture of Elizabethan and Jacobean England and the ways in which this is reflected in Shakespeare's plays, without making claims for unsubstantiated authorial belief or falling into the pit that is autobiographical readings of the material.
While Wyrick and Nasrallah regard later grammarians, scholars, and commentators as primarily responsible for the creation of particular ancient authorial identities, Krueger's suggestion that an author's deliberate employment of "authorial practices," a form of self-positioning, translated directly into an effective authorial persona, is indicative of a strong textualist approach that focuses more on the interpretation of textual representations than their historical efficacy.
Her assessment is based on an ethics of authorial renunciation: The work of Oda Projesi is better than that of Hirschhorn because it exemplifies a superior model of collaborative practice.
No authorial voice jumps in to make pronouncements.
Throughout his 1798 anti-feminist satire, The Unsex'd Females, Richard Polwhele constructs a clear dichotomy between a female authorial subject whose literary activities do not compromise the operation of a femininity "to NATURE true" (11) and the "unsex'd" female author whose literary pursuits render her monstrous, deviant, and, above all, "unnatural.
At one point in the narrative the authorial voice intrudes to express her support for Margaret.
Using a capacious definition of autobiography based on Philippe Lejeune's notion of the "autobiographical pact," Glass claims that such texts mark the point of contact between the public and the private life of an author and thus reveal his or her attempt "to reappropriate the public discourse that determines the authorial career" (7).