Australopithecus

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Related to australopithecine: Australopithecus africanus, Babur, Neanderthal

Australopithecus

a genus of early Pleistocene primate that was hominid in some features but ape-like in others, such as the skull. Southern African in origin, Australopithecus was upright in posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, although Hrdy labels the australopithecines as "bipedal apes," they are in fact on the human line.
In the development of the Oldowan tool industry, Homo habilis revealed a degree of creativity that no australopithecine or other primate could possibly have replicated.
0 mya, other Australopithecine forms (africanus and robustus) were present in South Africa as well as the east African region (Jurmain et al.
Its long arms and short legs are reminiscent of the australopithecine, which lived 2 million years ago, but its skull and teeth were much more modern, something like those of Homo erectus, a close human ancestor.
Primate Models of Australopithecine Sexual Dimorphism," in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 45, 1976.
The group concluded that the fossils were those of a hominid because the upper canines are small and the dental enamel is thicker than in chimpanzees but thinner than in Australopithecine.
tall, a three-and-a-half million year old example of an entirely new species of the australopithecine genus, later officially named A.
The cooling of the coastal waters off southwest Africa would have reduced rainfall inland, gradually changing the region from a temperate wooded environment, where Australopithecine remains have been found, to an and grassland environment, where homo species seem to have been better suited and gained an evolutionary edge.
But the picture has become more confused recently with the discovery of three new australopithecine species in Africa and another, poorly understood, genus of early hominid called Ardipithecus.
Wells seems to accept the fossil evidence at face value and contents himself with pointing out the confusion over Neanderthals when they were first discovered, or how reconstructions vary over how human an australopithecine might have looked in life.
1995 "The first australopithecine 2,500 kilometres west of the Rift Valley" (Chad), en: Nature, vol.
It's the first time we have a virtually complete skeleton of an australopithecine, or ape-man.