auscultation

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auscultation

 [aw″skul-ta´shun]
listening for sounds produced within the body, chiefly to assess the condition of the thoracic or abdominal organs and vessels such as the heart, lungs, aorta, and intestines. Fetal heart tones can also be monitored during pregnancy by auscultation with a specialized stethoscope. It may be performed with the unaided ear (direct or immediate auscultation) or with a stethoscope (mediate auscultation). See also auscultatory sounds.

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn),
Listening to the sounds made by the various body structures as a diagnostic method.
[L. ausculto, pp. -atus, to listen to]

auscultation

/aus·cul·ta·tion/ (aws″kul-ta´shun) listening for sounds within the body, chiefly to ascertain the condition of the thoracic or abdominal viscera and to detect pregnancy; it may be performed with the unaided ear (direct or immediate a.) or with a stethoscope (mediate a.) .auscul´tatory

auscultation

(ô′skəl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of listening.
2. Medicine The act of listening for sounds made by internal organs, as the heart and lungs, to aid in the diagnosis of certain disorders.

auscultation

[ôs′kəltā′shən]
Etymology: L, auscultare, to listen
the act of listening for sounds within the body to evaluate the condition of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, pleura, intestines, or other organs or to detect the fetal heart sound. Auscultation may be performed directly with the unaided ear, but most commonly a stethoscope is used to determine the frequency, intensity, duration, and quality of the sounds. auscultate, v., auscultatory [ôskul′tətôr′ē] , adj.
enlarge picture
Sites for auscultation of lung sounds

auscultation

The act of auscultating.

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn)
Listening to the sounds made by various body structures and functions as a diagnostic method, usually with a stethoscope.
[L. auscultatio, fr. ausculto, pp. auscultatus, to listen, + -io, noun suffix]

auscultation

The act of listening with a stethoscope to the sounds made by the heart, lungs, blood passing through narrowed vessels, the movement of fluid or gas in the abdomen, and so on. The doctor listens for changes in the normal sounds and for new (adventitious) sounds. Heart specialists become skilled in the interpretation of subtle sounds inaudible to the novice. From the Latin auscultare , to listen attentively.

Auscultation

The process of listening to sounds that are produced in the body. Direct auscultation uses the ear alone, such as when listening to the grating of a moving joint. Indirect auscultation involves the use of a stethoscope to amplify the sounds from within the body, like a heartbeat.
Mentioned in: Physical Examination

auscultation

diagnosis, by listening to the sounds made by various body structures (e.g. chest or heart sounds)

auscultation (·skl·tāˑ·shn),

v listening to body sounds—especially the heart, lungs, intestines, pleura, blood, and vessels—for diagnostic purposes or to find a fetal heartbeat.
Enlarge picture
Auscultation.

bruit 

A sound heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, large arteries or veins, or any large cavity (e.g. the orbit). The auscultation is carried out with a stethoscope. Example: An occlusive disease of the carotid artery caused by atherosclerosis leads to a reduction in blood flow through the carotid arteries (and a concomitant reduction in blood flow through vessels of the eye and orbit). It gives rise to a swishing sound with the chest piece of the stethoscope on the neck over the carotid artery. See amaurosis fugax.

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn)
Listening to the sounds made by various body structures as a diagnostic method.
[L. auscultatio, fr. ausculto, pp. auscultatus, to listen, + -io, noun suffix]

auscultation (ôskultā´shən),

n the examination procedure of listening for sounds produced by the body to detect or judge an abnormal condition.

auscultation

listening for sounds produced within the body, chiefly to ascertain the condition of the thoracic or abdominal viscera; it may be performed with the unaided ear (direct or immediate auscultation) or with a stethoscope (mediate auscultation).

abdominal auscultation
for the purpose of listening to the sounds created by the movement of gas and fluid in the intestines, and in the forestomachs in ruminants. The presence or absence of sounds is valuable in assessing the motility of the gut.
cardiac auscultation
auscultation of the cardiac area with special attention to location and size of the heart, the rhythm and intensity of the heart sounds, the presence of abnormal sounds and the relationship of the heart sounds to the occurrence of the pulse waves.
auscultation with percussion
auscultation of one part of the region while percussing elsewhere. Used in examining the chest for areas of consolidation, or the bovine abdomen when searching for the displaced abomasum or the distended colon or duodenum.
pulmonary auscultation
auscultation of both sides of the chest with the objective of ascertaining the state of the lungs and air passages. Points observed are the rhythm and depth of breathing, quality of the breath sounds and the size and disposition of the area over which they can be heard.
thoracic auscultation
includes auscultation of the lungs and air passages, the pleural cavity including the presence of extraneous organs such as intestines, and the heart and pericardial sac. The principal rule in the examination is the absolute necessity of auscultating both sides of the chest.
tuning fork auscultation
the tip of a tuning fork is placed over the area to be auscultated and the stethoscope applied nearby. Consolidated lung transmits the sound, normal lung muffles it. See also coin test.
References in periodicals archive ?
The picture shows a kindly pediatrician auscultating a girl's doll with an old-fashioned stethoscope.
The fourth physician (Macdiarmid) recorded the sounds of phthisis after auscultating and percussing a patient in June 1845 (fol.
Leopold Auenbrugger was ridiculed for percussing and auscultating his patients' chests; lgnaz Semmelweiss's recommendation for doctors to wash their hands before each patient landed him in a mental asylum; and more recently, cardiologists denied Nathan Pritikin's program for dietary modification to modulate cardiovascular risk until after his death.