auscultate


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auscultate

 [aw´skul-tāt]
to examine by auscultation.

aus·cul·tate

, auscult (aws'kŭl-tāt, aws-kŭlt'),
To perform auscultation.

auscultate

(ô′skəl-tāt′)
tr.v. auscul·tated, auscul·tating, auscul·tates Medicine
To examine by auscultation.

aus′cul·ta′tive adj.
aus·cul′ta·to′ry (ô-skŭl′tə-tôr′ē) adj.

auscultate

[ôs′kəltāt]
Etymology: L, auscultare, to listen
to practice auscultation, or to listen and interpret sounds produced within the body.

auscultate

verb To listen with a stethoscope to internal organs—heart, lungs, GI tract—for sounds of diagnostic portent.

Sounds of potential diagnostic significance
Heart
Gallops, murmurs, rubs.

Lungs
Bronchophony, rales.

GI tract
Gurgles, sounds of moving gas or liquid.

auscultate

verb Physical examination To listen with a stethoscope to internal organs–heart, lungs, GI tract–for sounds of diagnostic portent

aus·cul·tate

, auscult (aws'kŭl-tāt, aws-kŭlt')
To perform auscultation.

aus·cul·tate

, auscult (aws'kŭl-tāt, aws-kŭlt')
To perform auscultation.

auscultate

to examine by auscultation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nurses can palpate the abdomen for distention or abdominal mass and auscultate the abdomen for bowel sounds.
He would then auscultate what he could reach with his stethoscope through the 3-square-inch opening.
Auscultate over the stomach and, if gurgling is heard, begin feeding.
4]), it is important to auscultate the heart every 4 hours (Braunwald, 2005).
We all auscultate, but if the lungs are consolidated while the bronchi remain open, breath sounds may actually seem more clear, or "brighter," over the side with the pneumonia than on the other side.
Auscultate and palpate for TMJ sounds (ie, clicking or crepitus) 5.
Auscultate heart sounds most effectively when the patient is lying on the left side or supine; listen on the left or right side of the sternum at the second intercostal space.
Centuries before percussion and the stethoscope, the Hippocratic School of Cos and the School of Cnidus taught students to observe, to palpate, and, with the ear on the chest, to auscultate.
One way I do this is to pass her my stethoscope (when I auscultate her lungs) so that she can correlate her subjective feelings of pulmonary obstruction with her breath sounds.
When determining if a patient is aspirating, it is useful to auscultate over the: a.
Heart: LVH, CHF, MI, angina (assessment technique: auscultate S4, S3, shifted PMI, cardiomegaly on X-ray, LVH on ECG, pulmonary "crackles")
Auscultate lungs, suction the airway to clear secretions.