atrial flutter

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flutter

 [flut´er]
a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter a cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (230–380 per minute), but regular. Two types, I and II, are distinguished according to rate; Type I is also more amenable to cardioversion. In Type I the atrial rate is usually 290 to 310 per minute but can range from 230 to 350. In Type II the atrial rate is usually 360 to 380 per minute but can range from 340 to 430.
diaphragmatic flutter peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter see mediastinal flutter.
pure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
ventricular flutter a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

a·tri·al flut·ter

, auricular flutter
rapid regular atrial contractions occurring usually at rates between 250 and 330 per minute (Type I atrial flutter) and often producing "sawtooth" waves in the electrocardiogram, particularly leads II, III, and aVF. Type II atrial flutter is at rates of 330-450 per minute. Unlike Type I, it cannot be terminated by overdrive pacing.

atrial flutter

n.
Rapid regular atrial contractions usually occurring at rates between 250 and 350 per minute and often producing saw-tooth waves in an electrocardiogram.

atrial flutter (AF)

a type of atrial tachycardia characterized by contraction rates between 230/min and 380/min. Two kinds, typical and atypical, have been identified and are distinguished from each other by their rates and electrocardiographic (ECG) patterns. During typical atrial flutter the atrial rate is between 290/min and 310/min and produces "fence post" or "sawtooth" ECG waves. During atypical atrial flutter the atrial rate is higher, and the ECG waves lack the sawtooth appearance, and are often sinusoidal. For both types, ventricular contractions usually follow atrial contractions in a 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, or variable ratio. It may be cured with electrophysiological radiofrequency ablation. Compare atrial fibrillation.

atrial flutter

Cardiology Rapid, well organized contraction of the atrium at a rate of 250-350 beats/min; at atrial beats < 200/min, the ventricles can respond in a 1:1 fashion–at higher atrial rates, they respond with a 2:1, 3:1, or 4:1 block EKG Sawtooth waves and evidence of continued electric activity, best seen in II, III, aVf or V1 Etiology Paroxysmal AF may occur in normal hearts; chronic–persistent AF is often associated with underlying heart disease–eg, rheumatic or ischemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, or PTE, mitral or tricuspid stenosis or regurgitation, thyrotoxicosis, alcoholism, pericarditis Clinical Asymptomatic, flutter in jugular venous pulse Management Synchronous DC–direct current cardioversion at low energy–.
< 50 joules; CCBs–eg, verapamil and diltiazem

a·tri·al flut·ter

, auricular flutter (ā'trē-ăl flŭt'ĕr, awr-ik'yū-lăr flŭt'ĕr)
Rapid regular atrial contractions occurring usually at rates between 250 and 350 per minute and often producing "saw-tooth" waves in the electrocardiogram, particularly leads II, III, and aVF.

atrial flutter

An abnormality of heart rhythm affecting the upper chambers of the heart which beat at an abnormally rapid rate of between 240 and 400 per minute. It is believed to be a form of oscillation caused by a feed-back loop of impulses within the heart muscle and independently of the natural pace-maker - the sino-atrial node. These impulses are transmitted to the lower chambers and the result is a grossly irregular pulse with a heart rate of 60 to 180 beats per minute.

Atrial flutter

A rapid pulsation of the upper chamber of the heart that interferes with normal function.

flutter

a rapid vibration or pulsation.

atrial flutter
cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (200-320 per minute), but regular.
diaphragmatic flutter
peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause. See also synchronous diaphragmatic flutter.
impure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter
abnormal mobility of the mediastinum during respiration.
pure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
flutter valve
in an intravenous infusion apparatus, a floating bead in the fluid chamber that allows air to enter the system but prevents fluid from escaping. Its movement is often viewed as an indicator of the speed of fluid infusion, but it is inaccurate.
ventricular flutter
a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.