aural rehabilitation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to aural rehabilitation: Speech reading

aural rehabilitation

a form of therapy in which hearing-impaired individuals are taught to improve their ability to communicate. Methods taught include, but are not limited to, speech-reading, auditory training, use of hearing aids, and use of assistive listening devices such as telephone amplifiers.

aural rehabilitation

Any therapy used to improve the speech and communication of the hearing impaired.

Components of aural rehabilitation
Hearing aid orientation, listening strategies, speechreading, auditory training, speech cuing, total communication.

aural rehabilitation

Audiology Any technique used for the hearing-impaired to improve their speech and communication. See Speech therapy.

au·ral re·ha·bil·i·ta·tion

(awr'ăl rē'hă-bil'i-tā'shŭn)
Procedures to enhance the communication capacity of people with hearing impairments, such as auditory training, lip reading, and hearing aid orientation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hearing aid effectiveness after aural rehabilitation individual versus group (HEARING) trial: RCT design and baseline characteristics.
Hearing impairment can easily be identified with a well-implemented screening process and improved with the help of an aural rehabilitation program that employs the use of assistive technology.
The use of a hearing aid should be considered as only part of a comprehensive aural rehabilitation plan designed by an audiologist specifically for the individual.
Hawkins' review of the effectiveness of group aural rehabilitation programs concluded that large randomized controlled trials are needed that include patients from the general population (i.
In addition, comparison studies of CROS and BiCROS with other methods of unilateral aural rehabilitation have found the former lacking.
For some patients, an extensive learning period involving intensive aural rehabilitation with a speech pathologist may be required for successful implant use.
Provide aural rehabilitation for residents, families and staff
Specific responsibilities include assessment and management of disorders of speech and language, dysphagia (disorders of swallowing), identification and treatment of persons requiring augmentative or alternate forms of communication, the assessment and treatment of cognitive/communication disorders, the provision of aural rehabilitation services to hearing impaired individuals, and facilitating communication effectiveness, as with persons requiring foreign accent reduction.
We conclude, therefore, that a significant difference between audiometric findings and HDHS self-assessments is useful in identifying patients who might benefit from additional counseling and/or aural rehabilitation.