auditory hallucination


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hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

a symptom frequently a part of or a frequent symptom in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.

auditory hallucination

Etymology: L, audire, to hear, alucinari, a wandering mind
commonly seen in schizophrenia. It is a subjective experience of hearing voices or other sounds despite the absence of an actual reality-based external stimulus to account for the phenomenon.

auditory hallucination

A hallucination involving the perception of sounds arising from outside of the head, most commonly of voices, in absence of auditory stimuli, which may occur in absence of psychosis or mental illness.

Aetiology
Brainstem lesions—e.g., post-stroke, tumours, encephalitis, infection and abscesses.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(awdi-tōr-ē hă-lūsi-nāshŭn)
Symptom commonly seen in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder patients that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive factors in source monitoring and auditory hallucinations.
The area treated was a region in the left temporal parietal lobe area that previously had been identified as being involved in auditory hallucinations by positron emission tomography.
The experience may have left her vulnerable to the condemnatory auditory hallucinations she now experienced.
Auditory hallucinations of hearing voices in 375 normal subjects.
In one exercise, the officer is surrounded by voices on all sides, to learn how someone experiencing auditory hallucinations might have difficulty following verbal commands.
Each group member listens to a short, commercially produced audiotape simulating the experience of auditory hallucinations while being interviewed by group members.
In his testimony Thursday, the psychiatrist said he examined Takuma with a different doctor in April 1999 and diagnosed him with schizophrenia after Takuma complained of auditory hallucinations.
Paranoia and visual, tactile and auditory hallucinations are often a result of long-term sleep deprivation.
When Clean, Shaven was screened in New York at New Directors/New Films seven years ago, a discomfited audience viscerally experienced the terrifying auditory hallucinations that torment the mentally imbalanced protagonist, who may or may not have committed a murder.
At times, when recounting the primal scene, Beloved experiences visual and auditory hallucinations which seem to transport her back to the ship.
Like LSD, psilocybin and peyote induce visual hallucinations minutes after ingestion, but auditory hallucinations are frequently experienced some two hours later; other kinds of hallucinations occur only sporadically (La Barre 1975: 12-13).
One of the subjects exhibited auditory hallucinations (hearing voices), while the other four developed other forms of delusions.