audiologist


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audiologist

 [aw″de-ol´o-jist]
an allied health professional specializing in audiology, who provides services that include evaluation of hearing function to detect hearing impairment and, if there is a hearing disorder, to determine the anatomical site involved and its cause; selection of appropriate hearing aids; and training in lip reading, hearing aid use, and maintenance of normal speech.

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ōjist),
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of patients whose communication disorders stem in whole or in part from hearing impairment.

audiologist

a health professional with graduate education in normal hearing processes and hearing loss, who detects and evaluates hearing loss, and who determines how a client can best make use of remaining hearing. If a client can benefit from assistive listening devices such as hearing aids, the audiologist assists with the selection, fitting, and training in their use. See also speech-language pathologist.

audiologist

A healthcare professional trained to identify and measure hearing impairments and related disorders—e.g., balance or vestibular disorders and tinnitus—and rehabilitate patients with impaired hearing and related disorders.

audiologist

Audiology A non-MD health care professional trained to identify and measure hearing impairment and related disorders–eg, balance or vestibular disorders and tinnitus, and rehabilitate Pts with impaired hearing and related disorders; audiologists use various tests and procedures to assess hearing and balance Salary $52K + 6% bonus. See Speech pathology.

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of those whose communication disorders center in whole or in part in the hearing function.

audiologist

A specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of defects of hearing.

Audiologist

A person with a degree and/or certification in the areas of identification and measurement of hearing impairments and rehabilitation of those with hearing problems.
Mentioned in: Hearing Aids

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of patients whose communication disorders stem in whole or in part from hearing impairment.

audiologist,

n individual trained to identify, diagnose, measure, and rehabilitate hearing impairments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now is the time for audiologists to analyze their pricing model to ensure it is in the best interest of their business.
The three PATM audiologists therefore did not represent true clinical practice whereby an audiologist comfortable with leading workshops and motivated to patiently administer specialized counseling would be selected to provide tinnitus management.
5StarMax also points out that this is an excellent audiologist marketing strategy, costing nothing but a little time and effort in its entirety.
Once the audiologist confirms the degree of hearing loss, she assists the child in maximizing any residual hearing.
Daisy Monticelli, whose 5-year-old daughter Marenpreviously had received mapping services in Eugene, said she now takes her daughter to Portland to see an educational audiologist, who works primarily with children with cochlear implants.
Audiologists like Farrell are engaged in the scientific study of hearing and help to prevent and assess hearing disorders, as well as fit and dispense amplification systems such as hearing aids.
I didn't know which path to take, and was considering going back into full-time education when I saw an advert about opportunities to train as a hearing aid audiologist with Scrivens.
An audiologist is a hearing health professional who identifies and measures hearing loss and will perform a hearing test to assess the type and degree of loss.
The consuiting audiologist contacted manufacturers and obtained the registered owner of the unclaimed hearing aids in our possession.
The primary rehabilitation approach for older persons with hearing loss is fitting with amplification and/or assistive listening devices (ALD's) and counseling; ironically, only a small percentage of these individuals seek the services of an audiologist to obtain amplification, ALD's, or aural rehabilitation, while most passively accept that hearing loss is a part of aging and that treatment is unavailable.
He has decades of experience in academia including influential roles at Northwestern University, Vanderbilt University and the University of Minnesota Medical School, where he was the first audiologist in the state to openly dispense hearing aids.
Glaser, an audiologist who runs a practice management consulting firm for healthcare practitioners, and Traynor, an audiologist and practice manager who teaches at the U.