audiology

(redirected from audiologically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

audiology

 [aw″de-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the sense of hearing, especially in the evaluation and measurement of hearing loss and the rehabilitation of those with impaired hearing. See also audiologist.

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ō-jē),
1. The study of hearing disorders through the identification and measurement of hearing impairment.
2. The rehabilitation of persons with hearing impairments.

audiology

/au·di·ol·o·gy/ (aw″de-ol´ah-je) the study of impaired hearing that cannot be improved by medication or surgical therapy.

audiology

(ô′dē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of hearing, especially hearing defects and their treatment.

au′di·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
au′di·ol′o·gist n.

audiology

[-ol′əjē]
Etymology: L, audire + Gk, logos, science
a field of research and clinical practice devoted to the study of hearing disorders, assessment of hearing, hearing conservation, and aural rehabilitation. audiologic, audiological, adj.

audiology

The formal study of hearing, hearing loss, balance and other disorders affecting the vestibulocochlear (8th cranial, acoustic) nerve.

audiology

The study of hearing

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of hearing disorders through the identification and measurement of functional hearing loss as well as the rehabilitation of persons with hearing impairments.

audiology

The scientific study of hearing and of the medical management of hearing defects.

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. Study of hearing disorders through identification and measurement of hearing impairment.
2. Rehabilitation of patients with hearing impairments.

audiology (ô´dēol´əjē),

n the study of the entire field of hearing, including the anatomy and function of the ear; impairment of hearing; and evaluation, education or reeducation, and treatment of persons with hearing loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
People who are audiologically deaf perceive themselves as "people who are deaf," use English (or another language used by hearing people) as their native language, whether signed (e.
Because of the transient nature of the hearing loss in TAD, it has not been possible to audiologically evaluate the nature of the hearing loss.
3,4) Audiologically, cerumen occlusion adversely affects audiometric test results in some cases and prevents testing in others.
In order to be eligible for this study, cases had to have involved (1) patients of either sex who were between 17 and 60 years of age, (2) clinically diagnosed and audiologically corroborated otosclerosis, (3) a 65-dB conductive hypoacusis with tone loss, and (4) stapedectomy with placement of either a Teflon prosthesis or a wire/Teflon prosthesis.