audible

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audible

[ô′dəbəl]
Etymology: L, audire, to hear
capable of being heard. Some animals are able to hear sounds of higher or lower frequencies and different intensities than those audible to most humans.

audible

(od′ĭ-bl)
Capable of being heard.
audibility (od″ĭ-bil′ĭt-ē) audibly (od′ĭ-blē)
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, audibility may be more of a meaningful issue in urban settings than in remote settings.
The audibility of the Aurora Borealis was a contentious issue in expedition narratives and diaries written by Arctic explorers and there is considerable historical evidence that scientists remained preoccupied by this anomalous feature of auroral culture throughout the long nineteenth century.
High portability, good audibility, and the quality of the voice were mentioned as advantages.
It implies the commitment to promote equal audibility through public policies (including ones concerning the structure of the economy), social movements, and group or individual actions.
Thus, the subjects in the moderate and severe groups who were longtime hearing aid users could have preferred the omnidirectional setting because of the increased low-frequency gain available in this condition, despite the relative equality of overall audibility.
co-presence, visibility, audibility, cotemporality, and simultaneity).
According to Lyra, the Micro Ridge "reduces groove wear and greatly reduces the audibility of groove damage.
In recent years, the works of composer and organist Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656) have enjoyed a renewed popularity among early-music performers, resulting in some outstanding recordings as well as increased audibility in the concert hall.
Custom dictionaries ensure audibility and proper pronunciation of names, abbreviations and acronyms.
Among the issues addressed by Kramer are the audibility of anti-Semitic content in the Prelude to Lohengrin, the intermingling of nationalism and sexual identity in Der Ring des Nibelungen, and the ways in which some later composers responded to Richard Wagner's music.
The verbal consists of the words and phraseology, the pace of your delivery, the audibility and clarity of your speech.
Noise and frequency distortion can seriously undercut the intelligibility of human speech even though its audibility is good.