atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance


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atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS),

the term in the Bethesda system for reporting cervical/vaginal cytologic diagnosis describing cellular abnormalities that are more marked than those attributable to reactive changes but that quantitatively or qualitatively fall short of a definitive diagnosis of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion; may reflect a benign or a potentially serious lesion.
See also: Bethesda system, reactive changes.

a·typ·i·cal squa·mous cells of un·de·ter·mined sig·nif·i·cance

(ASCUS) (ā-tip'i-kăl skwā'mŭs sel zŭn-dĕ-tĕr'mind sig-nif'i-kăns)
The term in the Bethesda system for reporting cervical-vaginal cytologic diagnosis describing cellular abnormalities that are more marked than those attributable to reactive changes but that quantitatively or qualitatively fall short of a definitive diagnosis of squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL); may reflect a benign or a potentially serious lesion.
See also: Bethesda system, reactive changes
References in periodicals archive ?
Human papillomavirus DNA testing has already been demonstrated to be useful for reflex testing of Papanicolaou test smears with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance.
Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, human papillomavirus, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or 3 in adolescents: ASC-US, age, and high-grade cervical neoplasia.
Diagnosis of cases based on cytology Broad cytology Details of cytology Number diagnosis (N) diagnosis of cases Unsatisfactory * (5) 5 Negative ** (95) Normal 4 Inflammation (non-specific) 88 Inflammation (specific) (+) 3 Squarnous epithelial ASC-US 7 lesions (33) ASC-H 3 AGUS 2 L-SIL 5 H-SIL 16 Total (133) 133 * Cases with scant, non-representative smear ** Cases negative for epithelia] lesions (+) Of the 3 cases, 2 had Trichomonas vaginalis and 1 had Candida infection ASC-IS, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance ASC-H, ?
Since then, a few reports have documented its occurrence in humans, mostly in patients with negative Papanicolaou tests, occasionally with diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and LSIL.
Among 18-year-olds with Pap smears classified as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 71% will be positive for high-risk HPV and two-thirds will continue to be abnormal on a repeat Pap smear.
The category of squamous cell abnormality includes the subcategories of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), and squamous cell carcinoma.
6) In fact, the largest available US studies reflecting the use of the conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) test have repeatedly shown that more histopathologic CIN 2/3 lesions are identified in patients with a preceding abnormal Pap test interpretation of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) than are identified in patients with a preceding abnormal Pap test interpretation of HSIL or any other specific abnormal cytologic result.
Self-collected samples and clinician-collected samples had similar sensitivity and specificity for both atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.
Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) was initially introduced in the 1988 Bethesda System to provide a category for those suspicious cases not otherwise able to be placed into a more-definitive category.
Detection of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA strains in a Pap test containing atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance is more predictive of progression to a more serious cervical condition than is a finding of atypical squamous cells in which a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cannot be ruled out, a large study has demonstrated.
Because of its design, the Ludwig-McGill HPV Natural History Study following 2,528 Brazilian women has provided several insights into the natural history of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS).
Given the low age-specific incidence of invasive cervical carcinoma in young females and the high prevalence of HR-HPV DNA in this population, reflex HPV testing of Pap tests with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in young female patients has been deemed unacceptable.

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