atypical hyperplasia

atypical hyperplasia

A non-specific term for any condition—usually billed as benign—in which cells have abnormal features and are increased in number. 
Note: Without a further adjectival qualifier (e.g., atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, complex endometrial hyperplasia with atypia), use of the term atypical hyperplasia is ill-advised, given that it doesn’t convey enough information to decipher the portent of a lesion so labelled.
Endometrium In the endometrium, atypical hyperplasia is associated with carcinoma (in the same biopsy), and even in absence of carcinoma in the original biopsy, carries an increased risk of future development of endometrioid carcinoma. Some cases have been reversed with progestogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prolonged exposure to endogenous and exogenous sex hormones, gene mutations, a family history of breast cancer, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, a sedentary lifestyle, high alcohol consumption, early age at menarche (<12 years), late age at menopause (>55 years), and clinical factors, such as biopsy-confirmed atypical hyperplasia, and having a high breast tissue and bone density are all risk factors for breast cancer.
6,7] Therefore, on the basis of aforementioned experts' views and our discovery, adrenal myelolipoma and atypical hyperplasia of adrenal cortex may be anatomically and functionally related in hormonally active cases.
After discussion of cytology and surgical pathology of the uterine cervix, including the diagnostic use of biomarkers in cervical pathology and guidelines for staging and reporting cervical neoplasia, chapters are organized around major pathologic entities in the uterus and cervix and cover the non-neoplastic endometrium and tumors of the uterine corpus, with discussion of problematic differential diagnoses such as complex atypical hyperplasia vs.
Some investigators have suggested that surgery can be confidently avoided if core-needle biopsy is performed with a vacuum-assisted device, more than 12 samples are obtained, no associated atypical hyperplasia is identified, and radiologic-pathologic concordancy is confirmed (3, 11).
Personal histories of atypical hyperplasia or radiation therapy to the chest also elevate risk.
The rate of atypical hyperplasia declined, which we didn't expect to see with the increased use of mammography to identify abnormal lesions," said researcher Dr Karla Kerlikowske, professor of medicine and epidemiology and biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco.
The authors analysed Rb2/p130 expression by immunohistochemistry staining in 102 specimens chosen to represent a spectrum of endometrial changes, including proliferative endometrium (n = 18), secretory endometrium (n = 18), simple or complex hyperplasia without atypia (n = 18), atypical hyperplasia (n = 18), and invasive carcinoma (n = 30).
Premenopausal women with a biopsy-confirmed diagnosis of atypical hyperplasia are at increased risk for later developing invasive breast cancer.
The term benign breast disease encompasses a number of nonproliferative and proliferative breast changes and includes, among other conditions, adenosis, cysts, benign tumors, and atypical hyperplasia.
Proliferation of sinusoidal cells and sinusoidal dilatation leads to atypical hyperplasia, whereas direct stimulation of hepatocytes with VCM leads to the proliferation of hepatocytes and formation of regeneratory nodules (10-12).
Other risk factors include age, family history, atypical hyperplasia (irregular cells in benign breast lumps) confirmed by biopsy, never having given birth to children or having had the first live birth at a late age, early age at first menstrual period, late menopause, recent use of oral contraceptives or postmenopausal estrogens, and higher education and socioeconomic status.
Premenopausal women with a type of benign breast disesase known as atypical hyperplasia, a growth of abnormal cells within the ducts, appear to have twice the risk of breast cancer as postmenopausal women who have the same benign breast disease.

Full browser ?